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Overview Imports are blocking operations: To maintain a consistent view of the data, the model is locked during the import, and concurrent imports run by end-users will need to run one after the other and will block the model for everyone else. Exports are blocking for data entry while the export data is retrieved, and then the model is released. During the blocking phase, users can still navigate within the model. Rule #1  Carefully Decide If You Let End-Users Import (And Export) During Business Hours Imports executed by end-users should be carefully considered, and if possible, executed once or twice a day. Customers more easily accept model updates at scheduled hours for a predefined time—even if it takes 10+ minutes—and are frustrated when these imports are run randomly during business hours. Your first optimization is to adjust the process and run these imports by an administrator at a scheduled time, and then let the user based know about the schedule. Rule #2 Use a Saved View The first part of any import (or export) is retrieving the data. The time it takes to open the view directly affects the time of the import or export. Always import from a saved view—NEVER from the default view. And use the naming convention for easy maintenance. Ensure the view is using optimized filters with a single Boolean value per axis. Hide the line items that are not needed for import; do not bring extra columns that are not needed. If you have done all of the above, and the view is still taking time to complete, consider using the Tabular Multi Column export and filter "in the way out." This has been proven to improve some sluggish exports.  Rule #3 Mapping Objective = Zero Errors or Warning Make sure your import executes with no errors or warnings as every error takes processing time. The time to import into a medium-to-large list (>50k) is significantly reduced if no errors are to be processed. In the import definition, always map all displayed line items (source→target) or use the "ignore" setting. Don't leave any line item unmapped. Rule #4 Watch the Formulas Recalculated During the Import If your end-users encounter poor performance when clicking a button that triggers an import or a process, it is likely due to the recalculations that are triggered by the import, especially if the action creates or moves items within a hierarchy. You will likely need the help of the Anaplan Model Optimization team to identify what formulas are triggered after the import is done and to get a performance check on these formulas to identify which one takes most of the time. Usually, those fetching many cells such as SUM, LOOUKP, ANY, or FINDITEM are likely to be responsible for the performance impact. Speak to your Business Partner for more details on the Model Optimization services available to you. To solve such situations, you will need to challenge the need for recalculating the formula identified each time a user calls the action. Often, for actions such as creations, moves, assignments done in WFP or Territory Planning, many calculations used for reporting are triggered in real-time after the hierarchy is modified by the import, and are not necessarily needed by users until later in the process. The recommendation is to challenge your customer and see if these formulas can be calculated only once a day, instead of each time a user runs the action. If this is acceptable, you'll need to rearchitect your modules and/or formulas so that these heavy formulas get to run through a different process run daily by an administrator and not by each end-users. If not, you will need to look at the formulas more closely to see what improvements can be made. Remember, breaking formulas up often helps performance. Rule #5 Don't Import List Properties Importing list properties takes more time than importing these as a module line item. Review your model list impacted by imports, and look to replace list properties with module line items when possible. Use a system module to hold these for the key hierarchies, as per D.I.S.C.O. Rule #6 Get Your Data Hub Hub and spoke: Setup a data hub model, which will feed the other production models used by stakeholders. Performance benefits: It will prevent production models to be blocked by a large import from an external data source. But since data hub to production model imports will still be blocking operations, carefully filter what you import, and use the best practices rules listed above. All import, mapping/transformation modules required to prepare the data to be loaded into planning modules can now be located in a dedicated data hub model and not in the planning model. This model will then be smaller and will work more efficiently. Try and keep the transaction data history in the data hub with a specific analysis dashboard made available for end users; often, the detail is not needed for planning purposes, and holding this data in the planning model has a negative impact on size, model opening times, and performance. As a reminder of the other benefits of a data hub not linked to performance: Better structure, easier maintenance: data hub helps keep all the data organized in a central location. Better governance: Whenever possible put this Data Hub on a different workspace. That will ease the separation of duties between production models and meta-data management, at least on actual data and production lists. IT departments will love the idea to own the data hub and have no one else be an administrator in the workspace. Lower implementation costs: A data hub is a way to reduce the implementation time of new projects. Assuming IT can load the data needed by the new project in the data hub, then business users do not have to integrate with complex source systems but with the Anaplan data hub instead. Rule #7 Incremental Import/Export This can be the magic bullet in some cases. If you export on a frequent basis (daily or more) from an Anaplan model into a reporting system, or write back to the source system, or simply transfer data from one Anaplan model to another, you have ways to only import/export the data that have changed since the last export. Use a Boolean line item to identify records that have changed and only import those.
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Summary This article describes the technique to dynamically filter specific levels of a hierarchy on a dashboard and provides a method to select and visualize hierarchies on a dashboard. Details This article explains how to configure the calculation of the level of a list in a hierarchy in order to apply specific calculations (custom summary) or filters by level on a dashboard. In this example, we have an organized hierarchy of 4 levels (Org L1 to Org L4). For each item in the hierarchy, we want to calculate a module value that returns the associated level that is to be displayed on a dashboard. Notes and Platform Context The technique addresses a specific limitation within dashboards where a composite hierarchy's list level cannot be selected if the list is synchronized to module objects on the dashboard. The technique uses a static module based on the levels of the composite structure used for filtering of the object on a dashboard. The technique is based on utilizing the Summary Method "Ratio" on line items corresponding to the list levels of the composite hierarchy to define the values of the filtering line items. Note that this method is not a formula calculation, but rather a use of the Summary Method Ratio on each line item applied to the composite hierarchy. Example List In this example, a four-level list composite hierarchy list is used. The hierarchy in this example has asymmetrical leaf items per parent: Defining the Level of Each List In order to calculate the level of each item in each of the lists L1 - L4, we need to create a module that calculates the associated level of each member by this technique: 1) Create as many line items as levels of hierarchy, plus one technical line item. 2) Configure the settings in the blueprint of the line items of this filtering module, per this example and table: Line Item Formula Applies to Summary Summary method Setting Ratio Technical line item* 1 (empty) Formula   Level or L4 (lowest level) 4 Org L4 Ratio* L3 / Technical L3 3 Org L3 Ratio L2 / Technical L2 2 Org L2 Ratio L1 / Technical L1 1 Org L1 Ratio L1 / Technical                     When applying these settings, the filtering module looks like this: *Note the Technical line item Summary method is using Formula. Alternatively, The Minimum Summary Method can be used but will return an error when a level of the hierarchy does not have any children and the level calculated is blank. The filtering module with Summary method applied results: Use the line item at the lowest level—Level (or L4) (LOWEST)—as the basis of filters or calculations. Applying a Filter on Specific Levels in Case of Synchronization When synchronization is enabled, the option “Select levels to show” is not available. Instead, a filter based on the level calculated can be used to show only specific levels. In the example, we apply a filter which matches any of the level 4 and 1: The following filtered dashboard result is achieved by using the composite hierarchy as a page selector:
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Little and Often Would you spend weeks on your budget submission spreadsheet or your college thesis without once saving it? Probably not. The same should apply to making developments and setting revision tags. Anaplan recommends that during the development cycle, you set revision tags at least once per day. We also advise testing the revision tags against a dummy model if possible. The recommended procedure is as follows: After a successful sync to your production model, create a dummy model using the ‘Create from Revision’ feature. This will create a small test model with no production list items. At the end of each day (as a minimum), set a revision tag and attempt to synchronize the test model to this revision tag. The whole process should only take a couple of minutes. Repeat step 2 until you are ready to promote the changes to your production model. Why Do We Recommend This? There are a very small number of cases where combinations of structural changes cause a synchronization error (99 percent of synchronizations are successful). The Anaplan team is actively working to provide a resolution within the product, but in most cases, splitting changes between revision tags allows the synchronization to complete. In order to understand the issue when a synchronization fails, our support team needs to analyze the structural changes between the revisions. Setting revision tags frequently provides the following benefits: The number of changes between revisions is reduced, resulting in easier and faster issue diagnosis.  It provides an early warning of any problems so that someone can investigate them before they become critical. The last successful revision tag allows you to promote some, if not most, of the changes if appropriate. In some cases, a synchronization may fail initially, but when applying the changes in sequence the synchronization completes. Using the example from above: Synchronizations to the test model for R1, R2, and R3 were all successful, but R3 fails when trying to synchronize to production. Since the test model successfully synchronized from R2 and then R3, you can repeat this process for the production model. The new comparison report provides clear visibility of the changes between revision tags.
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It is important to understand what Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) enables clients to do within Anaplan. In short, ALM enables clients to effectively manage the development, testing, deployment, and ongoing maintenance of applications in Anaplan. With ALM, it is possible to introduce changes without disrupting business operations by securely and efficiently managing and updating your applications with governance across different environments and quickly deploying changes to run more “what-if” scenarios in your planning cycles as you test and release development changes into production. Learn more here: Understanding model synchronization in Anaplan ALM Training on ALM is also available in the Education section 313 Application Lifecycle Management (ALM)
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“Back to the Future” Imagine this scenario: You are in the middle of making changes in your development model and have been doing so for the last few weeks. The changes are not complete and are not ready to synchronize. However, you just received a request for an urgent fix from the user community that is critical for the forthcoming monthly submission. What do you do? What you don’t want to do is take the model out of deployed mode! You also don’t want to lose all the development work you have been doing.  Don’t worry! Following the procedure below will ensure you can apply the hotfix quickly and keep your development work. The following diagram illustrates the procedure: It’s a two-stage process: Stage 1: Roll the development model back to a version that doesn’t contain any changes (is the same as production), and apply the hotfix to that version. Add a new revision tag to the development model as a temporary placeholder. (Note the History ID of the last structural change as you'll need it later.) On the development model, use History to restore to a point where development and production were identical (before any changes were made in development). Apply the hotfix. Save a new revision of the development model. Sync the development model with the production model. Production now has its hotfix. Stage 2: Restore the changes to development and apply the hotfix. On the development model, use the History ID from Stage 1 – Step 1 to restore to the version containing all of the development work (minus the hotfix). Reapply the hotfix to this version of development. Create a new revision of the development model. Development is now back to where it was, with the hotfix now applied. When your development work is complete, you can promote the new version to production using ALM best practice. The procedure is documented here: https://community.anaplan.com/t5/Anapedia-Model-Building/Fixing-Production-Issues/ta-p/4839
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Note that this article uses a planning dashboard as an example, but many of these principles apply to other types of dashboards as well. Methodology User stories Building a useful planning dashboard always starts with getting a set of very clear user stories, which describe how a user should interact with the system. The user stories need to identify the following: What the user wants to do. What data the user needs to see to perform this action. What data the user wants to change. How the user will check that changes made have taken effect. If one or more of the above is missing in a user story, ask the product owner to complete the description. Start the dashboard design, but use it to obtain the answers. It will likely change as more details arrive. Product owners versus designers Modelers should align with product owners by defining concrete roles and responsibilities for each team member. Product owners should provide what data users are expecting to see and how they wish to interact with the data, not ask for specific designs (this is the role of the modelers/designers). Product owners are responsible for change management and should be extra careful when dashboard/navigation is significantly different than what is currently being used (i.e. Excel ® ). Pre-demo peer review  Have a usability committee that: Is made up of modeling peers outside the project and/or project team members outside of modeling team. Will host a mandatory gate-check meeting to review models before demos to product owners or users. Committee is designed to ensure: Best design by challenging modelers. Consistency between models. The function is clear. Exceptions/calls to action are called out. The best first impression. Exception, call to action, measure impact Building a useful planning dashboard will be successful if the dashboard allows users to highlight and analyze exceptions (issues, alerts, warning), take action and plan to solve these, and always visually check the impact of the change against a target. Dashboard structure Example: A dashboard is built for these two user stories that compliment each other. Story 1: Review all of my accounts for a specific region, manually adjust the goals and enter comments. Story 2: Edit my account by assigning direct and overlay reps. The dashboard structure should be made of: Dashboard header: Short name describing the purpose of the dashboard at the top of the page in "Heading 1." Groupings: A collection of dashboard widgets. Call to action. Main grid(s). Info grid(s) : Specific to one item of the main grid. Info charts: Specific to one item of the main grid. Specific action buttons: Specific to one item of the main grid. Main charts: Covers more than one item of the main grid. Individual line items: Specific to one item of the main grid, usually used for commentaries. Light instructions. A dashboard can have more than one of these groupings, but all elements within a grouping need to answer the needs of the user story. Use best judgements to determine the number of groupings added to one dashboard. A maximum of two-to-three groupings is reasonable. Past this range, consider building a new dashboard. Avoid having a "does it all" dashboard, where users keep scrolling up and down to find each section. If users ask for a table of contents at the top of a dashboard, it's a sign that the dashboard has too much functionality and should be divided into multiple dashboards. Example:   General Guidelines  Call to action Write a short sentence describing the task to be completed within this grouping. Use the Heading 2 format. Main grid(s) The main grid is the central component of the dashboard, or of the grouping. It's where the user will spend most of their time. This main grid will display the KPIs needed for the task (usually in the columns) and will display one or more other dimension in the rows. Warning: Users may ask for 20+ KPIs and need these KPIs to be broken down by many dimensions, such as by product, actual/plan/variance, or by time. It's critical to have a main grid as simple and as decluttered as possible. Avoid the "data jungle" syndrome. Users are used to "data jungles" simply because that's what they are used to with Excel. Tips to avoid data jungle syndrome: Make a careful KPI election (KPIs are usually the line items of a module). Display the most important KPIs ONLY, which are those needed for decision making. Hide the others for now. A few criteria for electing a KPI in the main grid are: The KPI is meant to be compared across the dimension items in the rows, or across other KPIs. Viewing the KPI values for all of the rows is required to make the decision. The KPI is needed for sorting the rows (except on row name). A few criteria for not electing a KPI in the main grid are (besides not matching the above criteria) when we need these KPIs in more of a drill down mode; The KPI provides valid extra info, but just for the selected row of the Dashboard and does not need to be displayed for all rows. These "extra info" KPIs should be displayed in a different grid, which will be referred to as "info grid" in this document. Take advantage of the row/column sync functionality to provide a ton of data in your dashboard but only display data when requested or required. Design your main grid in such a way that it does not require the user to scroll left and right to view the KPIs: Efficiently select KPIs. Use the column header wrap. Set the column size accordingly. Vertical scroll It is ok to have users scroll vertically on the main grid. Only display 15 to 20 rows at a time when there are numerous rows, as well as other groupings and action buttons, to display on the same dashboard. Use sorts and a filter to display relevant data. Sort your grid Always sort your rows. Obtain the default sort criteria via user stories. If no special sort criteria is called out, use the alphanumeric sort on the row name. This will require a specific line item. Train end users to use the sort functionality. Filter your grid Ask end users or product owners what criteria to use to display the most relevant rows. It could be: Those that make 80 percent of a total. Use the RankCumulate function. Those that have been modified lately. This requires a process to attach a last modified date to a list item, updated daily via a batch mode. When the main grid allows item creation, always display the newly created first. Status Flag. If end users need to apply their own filter values on some attributes of the list items, such as filter to show only those who belong to EMEA or those whose status is "in progress," build pre-set user-based filters. Use the new Users list. Create modules dimensioned by user with line items (formatted as lists) to hold the different criteria to be used. Create a module dimensioned by Users and the list to be filtered. In this module resolve the filter criteria from above against the list attributes to a single Boolean. Apply this filter in the target module.  Educate the users to use the refresh button, rather than create an "Open Dashboard" button. Color code your grid Use colored cells to call attention to areas of a grid, such as green for positive and red for negative. Color code cells that specifically require data entry. Display the full details If a large grid is required, something like 5k lines and 100 columns, then: Make it available in a dedicated full-screen dashboard via a button available from the summary dashboard, such as an action button. Do not add such a grid to a dashboard where KPIs, charts, or multiple grids are used for planning.  These dashboards are usually needed for ad-hoc analysis and data discovery, or random verification of changes, and can create a highly cluttered dashboard. Main charts The main chart goes hand-in-hand with the main grid. Use it to compare one or more of the KPIs of the main grid across the different rows. If the main grid contains hundreds or thousands of items, do not attempt to compare this in the main chart. Instead, identify the top 20 rows that really matter or that make most of the KPI value and compare these 20 rows for the selected KPI. Location: Directly below or to the right of main display grid; should be at least partially visible with no scrolling. Synchronization with a selection of KPI or row of the main display grid. Should be used for: Comparison between row values of the main display grid. Displaying difference when the user makes change/restatement or inputs data. In cases where a chart requires 2–3 additional modules to be created: Implement and test performance. If no performance issues are identified, keep the chart. If performance issues are identified, work with product owners to compromise. Info grid(s) These are the grids that will provide more details for an item selected on the main grid. If territories are displayed as rows, use an info grid to display as many line items as necessary for this territory. Avoid cluttering your main grid by displaying all of these line items for all territories at once. This is not necessary and will create extra clutter and scrolling issues for end users. Location: Below or to the right of the main display grid. Synced to selection of list item in the main display grid. Should read vertically to display many metrics pertaining to list item selected. Info charts Similar to info grids, an info chart is meant to compare one or more KPIs for a selected item in the rows of the main grid. These should be used for: Comparison of multiple KPIs for a single row. Comparison or display of KPIs that are not present on the main grid, but are on info grid(s). Comparing a single row's KPI(s) across time. Place it on the right of the main grid, above or below an info grid. Specific action buttons Location: Below main grid; Below the KPI that the action is related to, OR to the far left/right - similar to "checkout." Should be an action that is to be performed on the selected row of the main grid. Can be used for navigation as a drill down to a detailed view of a selected row/list item. Should NOT be used as lateral navigation between dashboards; Users should be trained to use the left panel for lateral navigation. Individual line items Serve as a call out of important KPIs or action opportunities (i.e., user setting container for explosion, Container Explosion status). If actions taken by users require additional collaboration with other users, it should be published outside the main grid (giving particular emphasis by publishing the individual line item/s). Light instructions Call to action. Serves as a header for a grouping. Short sentence describing what the user should be performing within the grouping. Formatted in "Heading 2." Action Instructions. Directly located next to a drop-down, input field, or button where the function is not quite clear. No more than 5–6 words. Formatted in "instructions." Tooltips. Use Tooltips on modules and line items for more detailed instructions to avoid cluttering the dashboard.
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Dimension Order Affects Calculation Performance Ensuring consistency in the order of dimensions will help improve the performance of your models. This consistency is relevant for modules and individual line items. Why does the order matter? Anaplan creates and uses indexes to perform calculations. Each cell in a module where dimensions intersect is given an index number. Here are two simple modules dimensioned by Customer and Product. In the first module, Product comes first and Customer second, and in the second module, Customer is first and Product is second. In this model, there is a third module that calculates revenue as Prices * Volumes. Anaplan assigns indexes to the intersections in the module. Here are the index values for the two modules. Note that some of the intersections are indexed the same for both modules: Customer 1 and Product 1, Customer 2 and Product 2, and Customer 3 and Product 3, and that the remainder of the cells has a different index number. Customer 1 and Product 2 is indexed with the value of 4 in the top module and the value of 2 in the bottom module. The calculation is Revenue = Price * Volume. To run the calculation, Anaplan performs the following operations by matching the index values from the two modules. Since the index values are not aligned, the processor scans the index values to find a match before performing the calculation. When the dimensions in the module are reordered, these are the index values: The index values for each of the modules are now aligned. As the line-items of the same dimensional structure have an identical layout, the data is laid out linearly in memory. The calculation process accesses memory in a completely linear and predictable way. Anaplan’s microprocessors and memory sub-systems are optimized to recognize this pattern of access and to pre-emptively fetch the required data. How does the dimension order become different between modules? When you build a module, Anaplan uses the order that you drag the lists onto the Create Module dialog. The order is also dependent on where the lists are added. The lists that you add to the 'pages' area are first, then the lists that you add to the 'rows' area, and finally the lists added to the 'columns' area. It is simple to re-order the lists and ensure consistency. Follow these steps: On the Modules pane, (Model Settings>Modules) look for lists that are out of order in the Applies To column. Click the Applies To row that you want to re-order, then click the ellipsis. In the Select Lists dialog, click OK. In the Confirm dialog, click OK. The lists will be in the order that they appear in General Lists. When you have completed checking the list order in the modules, click the Line Items tab and check the line items. Follow steps 1 through 3 to re-order the lists. Subsets and Line Item Subsets One word of caution about Subsets and Line Item subsets. In the example below, we have added a subset and a Line Item Subset to the module: The Applies To is as follows: Clicking on the ellipsis, the dimensions are re-ordered to: The general lists are listed in order first, followed by subsets and then line item subsets. You still can reorder the dimensions by double-clicking in the Applies to column and manually copying or typing the dimensions in the correct order. Largest vs. Smallest? This is the normal follow up question, and unfortunately, the answer is "it depends." Through research we have found that it all depends on the data within the module. Also, it can get very confusing if subsets are used; the Customer list might be bigger than the Products list, but if a subset of Customers is used that is smaller than Products, then what?   Also, we don't advocate ordering the lists in the General Lists setting in size order; the lists should be ordered in hierarchical order top to bottom, so, by definition, that will be smallest to largest. So our advice is be consistent. Think about how you describe the problem. Does the business talk about Customer by Product, or Products for Customers? Agree to a convention, and stick to it. Other Dimensions The calculation performance only relates to the common lists between the source(s) and the target. The order of separate lists in one or other doesn’t have any bearing on the calculation speed.
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Personal dashboards are a great new feature that enables end users to save a personalized view of a dashboard. To get the most out of this feature, here are a few tips and tricks. Tidy Up Dashboards Any change to a master dashboard (using the Dashboard Designer) will reset all personal views of a dashboard, so before enabling personal dashboards, take some time to ensure that the current dashboards are up to date: Implement any pending development changes (including menu options). Turn on the Dashboard Quick Access toolbar (if applicable). Check and amend all text box headings and comments for size, alignment, spelling, and grammar. Delete or disable any redundant dashboards to ensure end users don’t create personal views of obsolete dashboards. Use Filters R ather Th an Show/Hide It’s best practice to use a filter rather than show and hide for the rows and/or columns on a grid.  This is now more beneficial because amending the items shown or hidden on a master dashboard will reset the personal views. For example, suppose you want to display just the current quarter of a timescale. You could manually show/hide the relevant periods, but, at quarter end when the Current Period is updated, the dashboard will need to be amended, and all those personal views will be reset. If you use a filter, referencing a time module, the filter criteria will update automatically, as will the dashboard. No changes are made to the master dashboard, and all the personal views are preserved.  Create a Communication and Migration Strategy Inevitably there will be changes that must be made to master dashboards. To minimize the disruption for end users, create a communication plan and follow a structured development program . These can include the following: Bundle up dashboard revisions into a logical set of changes. Publish these changes at regular intervals (e.g., on a monthly cycle). Create a regular communication channel to inform users of changes and the implications of those changes. Create a new dashboard, and ask end users to migrate to the new dashboard over a period of time before switching off the old dashboard. Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) If you are using ALM: any structural changes to master dashboards will reset all personal views of dashboards.
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Introduction The new Anaplan APIs and integration connectors leverage Certificate Authority (CA) -issued certificates.  These certificates can be obtained through your company's intermediary CA (typically issued by IT) or by purchasing it from a trusted Certificate Authority. Anaplan clients leveraging REST API v2.0 use both basic authentication and CA certificate based authentication. Examples of these clients include Anaplan Connect 1.4, Informatica Anaplan Connector, and Mulesoft 2.0.1. If you are migrating your Anaplan Connector scripts from v1.3 to v1.4, your available options for authentication will be basic authentication or CA certificate based authentication. This article outlines steps to perform in preparation for CA certificate authentication. Steps to prepare for CA certificate authentication Obtain a certificate from a CA authority Convert CA certificate to either a p12 or pfx file Import CA certificate into Internet Explorer/Mozilla Firefox to convert to a p12/pfx file Export CA certtificate from Internt Explorer/Mozilla Firefox to covert to a p12/pfx file Optional: Install Openssl tool Convert the p12/pfx file into a Java Keystore Manage CA certificates in Anaplan Tenant Administrator Validate CA certificate authentication via Anaplan Connect 1.4 script. Obtain a certificate from a CA authority You can obtain a certificate from CA authority by submitting a request or submit a request with a certificate signing requiest (CSR) containing your private key.  Contact your IT or Security Operations organization to determine if your company already has an existing relationship with a CA or intermediary CA. If your organization has an existing relationship with a CA or Intermediate CA you can request a client certificate be issued for your integration user. If your organization does not have an existing CA relationship, you should contact a valid CA to procure a client certificate. Convert CA certificate to either a p12 or pfx file Import CA certificate into IE/Firefox to convert to a p12/pfx file This section presents steps to import CA certificate into Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. CA certificate will be exported in the next section to either a p12 or pfx format. CA certificates may have .crt or .cer as file extensions. Internet Explorer Within Internet explorer, click on the Settings icon and select Internet option.    Navigate to the Content tab and then click on Certificates.   Click Import to launch the Certificate Import Wizard.   Click Browse to search & select the CA Certificate file. This file may have a file extension of .crt or .cer.    If a password was used when requesting the Certificate, enter it in this screen. Ensure that the “Mark this key as exportable” option is selected and click Next.    Select the certificate store in which to import the certificate and click Next.     Review the setting and click Finish.     The certificate should appear in the certificate store selected. Mozilla Firefox Within Firefox, select Options from the settings menu.    In the Options window, click Privacy & Security from the navigation pane on the left. Scroll to the very bottom and click on the View Certificates… button.    In the Certificate Manager, click the Import… button and select the certificate to convert and click Open.   If a password was provided when the certificate was requested, enter that password and click OK.    The certificate should now show up in the Certificate Manager.   Export CA certificate from IE/Firefox to convert to a p12/pfx file This section presents steps to export CA certificate from Internet Explorer (pfx) and Mozilla Firefox (p12). Internet Explorer (pfx) Select the certificate imported above and click the Export… button to initiate the Certificate Export Wizard.      Select the option “Yes, export the private key” and click Next.   Select the option for Personal Informatica Exchange – PCKS #12 (.PFX) and click Next.    Create a password, enter it and confirm it in the following screen.  This password will be used later on in the process. Click Next to continue.    Select a location to export the file and click Save.    Verify the file location and click Next.    Review the export settings, ensure that the Export Keys settings says “Yes”, if not start the export over. If all looks good, click Next. A message will appear when the export is successful.      Mozilla Firefox (p12) To export the certificate from Firefox, click the Backup… button in the Certificate Manager.  Select a location and a name for the file.  Ensure that the Save as type: is “PKCS12 Files (*.p12)”. Click the Save button to continue.    Enter a password to be used later when exporting the public and private keys. Click the OK button to finish.   Install openssl tool (Optional) If you haven't done so already, install openssl tool for your operating system.  List of third party binary distributions may be found on www.openssl.org or here. Examples in this article are shown for Windows platform. Convert the p12/pfx file into a Java Keystore Execute the following toto export the public and private keys exported above. In the commands listed below, the values that are customer specific are in Bold Italics. There is a screen shot at the end of this section that shows all of the commands run in sequence and it shows how the passwords relate between the steps. Examples in this article assume location of the certificate as the working directory. If you are executing these commands from a different directory (ex: ...\openssl\bin), then ensure you provide absolute directory path to all the files. Export the public key Public key will be exported from the certificate (p12/pfx) using openssl tool. Result is a .pem (public_key.pem) file that will be imported into Anaplan using Anaplan's Tenant Administrator client.   NOTE: The command below will prompt for a password. This password was created in steps above during export. openssl pkcs12 -clcerts -nokeys -in ScottSmithExportedCert.pfx -out public_key.pem Edit the public_key.pem file Remove everything before ---Begin Certificate --- (section highlighted in yellow). Ensure that the emailAddress value is populated with the user that will run the integrations. Export the Private Key This command will prompt for a password. This password is the password created in the export above. It will the prompt for a new password for the Private Key. It will also ask to confirm that password.  openssl pkcs12 -nocerts -in ScottSmithExportedCert.pfx -out private_key.pem Create P12 Bundle This command will prompt for the private key password from the step above. It will the prompt for a new password for the Bundle. It will also ask to confirm that password. openssl pkcs12 -export -in public_key.pem -inkey private_key.pem -out bundle.p12 -name Scott -CAfile public_key.pem -caname Scott In the command above,  public_key.pem is the file that was created in the step "Export the Public Key".  This is the file that will be registered with Anaplan using Anaplan Tenant Administrator.  private_key.pem is the file that was created in the step "Export the Private Key". bundle.p12  is the output file from this command, which will be used in the next step to create Java Keystore. Scott is the keystore alias. Add to Java Keystore (jks) Using keytool (typically found in <Java8>/bin), create a .jks file. This file will be referenced in Anaplan Connect 1.4 scripts for authentication. Command below will prompt for a new password for the entry into the keystore. It will also ask to confirm that password.  It will, then, prompt for the Bundle password from the step above. keytool -importkeystore -destkeystore my_keystore.jks -srckeystore bundle.p12 -srcstoretype PKCS12 In the command above: my_keystore.jks is the keystore file that will be referenced in your Anaplan Connect 1.4 scripts. bundle.p12 is the P12 bundle that was created in the last step.   Manage CA certificates in Anaplan Tenant Administrator In this step, you will add public_key.pem file to list of certificates in Anaplan Tenant Administrator. This file was created & edited in the first two steps of the last section. Log on to Anaplan Tenant Administrator. Navigate to Administration --> Security --> Certificates --> Add Certificate.   Validate CA certificate authentication via Anaplan Connect 1.4 script. Since you will be migrating to CA Certificate based authentication, you will need to upgrade your Anaplan Connect and associated scripts from v1.3 to v1.4. Community article, Migrating from Anaplan Connect 1.3.x.x to Anaplan Connect 1.4 will guide you through necessary steps. Follow the steps outlined in the article to edit & execute your Anaplan Connect 1.4 script. Examples provided (Windows & Linux) at the end of the article will validate authentication to Anaplan using CA Certificates and will return list of user's workspaces in a tenant.
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Filters can be very useful in model building and are widely used, but they can come at the expense of performance; often very visible to users through their use on dashboards. Performance can also hit imports and exports, which in turn may lead to the blocking of other activity, causing a poor perception of the model. There are some very simple guidelines to designing well performing filters: Using a single Boolean filter on a line item that does not have time or versions applied and does not have a summary is fastest. Try to create a Boolean line item that incorporates all the filter criteria you want to apply. This allows you to re-use the line item and combine a series of Boolean line items into a single Boolean for use in the filter. For example, you may want to filter on three data points: Volume, Product Category, and Active Status. Volume is numeric, Product Category is a list formatted line item matching a user selection, and Active Status is a Boolean. Create a line item called Filter with the following formula: Volume > Min Vol AND Product Cat = User Selection.Category AND Active Status Here’s a very simple example module to demonstrate this… A Filter line item is added to represent all the filters we need on the view. Only the Filter line needs to be dimensioned by Users. A User Selection module dimension only by Users is created to capture user-specific filter choices: Here’s the data before we apply the filter: With the filter applied: A best practice suggestion would be to create a filter module and line items for each filter part. You may want other filters and you can then combine each filter as needed from this system module. This should reduce repetition and give you control over the filters to ensure they can all be Boolean. What can make a filter slow? The biggest performance hit for filters are when nesting dimensions on rows. The performance loss is significantly increased by the number of nested dimensions and the number of levels they contain. With a flat list versus nested dimensions (filtering on the same number of items) the nested filter will be slower. This was tested with a 10,000,000 list versus 2 lists of 10 and 1,000,000 items as nested rows; the nested dimension filter was 40% slower. Filtering on line items with a line item summary will be slow. A numeric filter on 10,000,000 items can take less than a second, but with a summary will take at least 5 seconds. Multiple filters will increase time This is especially significant if any of the preceding filters do not lower the load, because they will take additional time to evaluate. If you do use multiple filter conditions, try to order them so the most effective filters are first. If a filter doesn’t often match on anything, evaluate whether it's even needed. Hidden levels act as a filter If you hide levels on a composite list, this acts like a filter before any other filter is applied. The hiding does take time to process and will impact more depending on the number of levels and the size of the list. How to avoid nested rows for export views Using nested rows can be a useful way to filter a complex set of data for export but, as discussed above, the filter performance here can be poor. The best way around this is to pivot the dimensions so there is only one dimension on rows and use the Tabular Multi Column export option with a Filter Row based on Boolean option. Some extra filter tips… Filter duration will affect saved views used in imports, so check the saved view open time to see the impact. This view open time will be on every use of the view, including imports or exports. If you need to filter on a specific list, create a subset of those items and create a new module dimensioned by the subset to view that data.
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Model Load: A large and complex model such as 10B cells can take up to 10 minutes to load the first time it's in use after a period of inactivity of 60 minutes. The only way to reduce the load time is by identifying what formula takes most of the time. This requires the Anaplan L3 support (ask for a Model Opening Analysis), but you can reduce the time yourself by applying the formula best practices listed above. One other possible leverage is on list setup: Text properties on a list can increase the load times, and subsets on lists can disproportionately increase load times. It is best practice not to use List Properties but house the attributes in a System model dimensioned by the list.  See Best practice for Module design for more details. Model Save: A model will save when the amount of changes made by end-users exceeds a certain threshold. This action can take several minutes and will be a blocking operation. Administrators have no leverage on model save besides formula optimization and reducing model complexity. Using ALM and Deployed mode increases this threshold, so it is best to use Deployed mode whenever possible. Model Rollback: A model will roll back in some cases of an invalid formula, or when a model builder attempts to adjust a setting that would result in an invalid state. In some large models, the rollback takes approximately the time to open the model, and up to 10 minutes worth of accumulated changes, followed by a model save. The recommendation is to use ALM and have a DEV model which size does not exceed 500M cells, with a production list limited to a few dozen items, and have TEST and PROD models with the full size and large lists. Since no formula editing will happen in TEST or PROD, the model will never rollback after a user action. It can roll back on the DEV model but will take a few seconds only if the model is small.
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Details of known issues  Challenge Recommendations Performance issues with long nested formulas Need to have a long formula on time as a result of nested intermediate calculations. If the model size does not prevent from adding extra line items, it's a better practice to create multiple intermediate line items and reduce the size of the formula, as opposed to nesting all intermediate calculations into one gigantic formula. This applies to summary formulae (SUM, LOOKUP, SELECT). Combining SUM and LOOKUP in the same line item formula can cause performance issues in some cases. If you have noticed a drop in performance after adding a combined SUM and LOOKUP to a single line item, then split it into two line items. RANKCUMULATE causes slowness A current issue with the RANKCUMULATE formula can mean that the time to open the model, including rollback, can be up to five times slower than they should be. There is currently no suitable workaround. Our recommendations are to stay within the constraints defined in Anapedia. SUM/LOOKUP with large cell count Separate formulas into different line items to reduce calculation time (fewer cells need to recalculate parts of a formula that would only affect a subset of the data). A known issue with SUM/LOOKUP combinations within a formula can lead to slow model open and calculation times, particularly if the line item has a large cell count. Example: All line items do not apply to time or versions. Y = X[SUM: R, LOOKUP: R] Y Applies to [A,B] X Applies to [A,B] R Applies to [B] list formatted [C] Recommendation: Add a new line item 'intermediate' that must have 'Applies To' set to the 'Format' of 'R' intermediate = X[SUM: R] Y = intermediate[LOOKUP: R]  This issue is currently being worked on by Development and a fix will be available in a future release Calculations are over non-common dimensions Anaplan calculates quicker if calculations are over common dimensions. Again, best seen in an example. If you have, List W, X Y = A + B Y Applies To W, X A Applies To W B Applies To W This performs slower than, Y = Intermediate Intermediate = A + B Intermediate Applies To W All other dimensions are the same as above. Similarly, you can substitute A & B above for a formula, e.g. SUM/LOOKUP calculations. Cell history truncated Currently, history generation has a time limit of 60 seconds set. The history generation is split into three stages with 1/3 of time allocated to each. The first stage is to build a list of columns required for the grid. This involves reading all the history. If this takes more than 20 seconds, then the user receives the message "history truncated after x seconds - please modify the date range," where X is how many seconds it took. No history is generated. If the first stage completes within 20 seconds, it goes on to generate the full list of history.  In the grid only the first 1000 rows are displayed; the user must Export history to get a full history. This can take significant time depending on volume.  The same steps are taken for model and cell history. The cell history is generated from loading the entire model history and searching through the history for the relevant cell information. When the model history gets too large then it is currently truncated to prevent performance issues. Unfortunately, this can make it impossible to retrieve the cell history that is needed. Make it real time when needed Do not make it real time unless it needs to be. By this we mean, do not have line items where users input data being referenced by other line items unless they have to be. A way around this could be to have users have their data input sections, which is not referenced anywhere, or as little as possible, and, say, at the end of the day when no users are in the model, run an import which would update into cells where calculations are then done. This may not always be possible if the end user needs to see resulting calculations from his inputs, but if you can limit these to just do the calculations that he needs to see and use imports during quiet times then this will still help. We see this often when not all reporting modules need to be recalculated real time. In many cases, many of these modules are good to be calculated the day after. Reduce dependencies Don't have line items that are dependent on other line items unnecessarily.This can cause Anaplan to not utilize the maximum number of calculations it can do at once. This happens where a line items formula cannot be calculated because it is waiting on results of other line items. A basic example of this can be seen with line item's A, B, and C having the formulas: A - no formula B= A C = B Here B would be calculated, and then C would be calculated after this. Whereas if the setup was: A - no formula B = A C = A Here B and C can be calculated at the same time. This also helps if line item B is not needed it can then be removed, further reducing the number of calculations and the size of the model. This needs to considered on a case-by-case basis and is a tradeoff between duplicating calculations and utilizing as many threads as possible. If line item B was referenced by a few other line items, it may indeed be quicker to have this line item. Summary calculation Summary cells often take processing time even if they are not actually recalculated because they must check all the lower level cells. Reduce summaries to ‘None’ wherever possible. This not only reduces aggregations, but also the size of the model.
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Overview: A dashboard with grids that includes large lists that have been filtered and/or sorted can take time to open. The opening action can also become a blocking operation; when this happens, you'll see the blue toaster box showing "Processing....." when the dashboard is opening. This article includes some guidelines to help you avoid this situation.  Rule 1: Filter large lists by creating a Boolean line item.  Avoid the use of filters on text or non-Boolean formatted items for large lists on the dashboard. Instead, create a line item with the format type Boolean and add calculations to the line item so that the results return the same data set as the filter would. Combine multiple conditions into a single Boolean value for each axis. This is especially helpful if you implement user-based filters, where the Boolean will be by the user and by the list to be filtered. The memory footprint of a Boolean line item is 8x smaller than other types of line items. Known issue: On an existing dashboard where a saved view is being modified by replacing the filters with a Boolean line item for filtering, you must republish it to the dashboard. Simply removing the filters from the published dashboard will not improve performance. Rule 2: Use the default Sort. Use sort carefully, especially on large lists. Opening a dashboard that has a grid where a large list is sorted on a text formatted line item will likely take 10 seconds or more and may be a blocking operation. To avoid using the sort: Your list is (by default) sorted by the criteria you need. If it is not sorted, you can still make the grid usable by reducing the items using a user-based filter. Rule 3: Reduce the number of dashboard components. There are times when the dashboard includes too many components, which slows performance. Avoid horizontal scrolling and try and keep vertical scrolling to no more than three pages deep. Once you exceed these limits, consider moving the components into multiple dashboards. Doing so will help both performance and usability. Rule 4: Avoid using large lists as page selectors. If you have a large list and use it as a page selector on a dashboard, that dashboard will open slowly. It may take 10 seconds or more. The loading of the page selector takes more than 90% of the total time. Known issue: If a dashboard grid contains list formatted line items, the contents of page selector drop-downs are automatically downloaded until the size of the list meets a certain threshold; once this size is exceeded, the download happens on demand, or in other words when a user clicks the drop down. The issue is that when Anaplan requests the contents of list formatted cell drop-downs, it also requests contents of ALL other drop-downs INCLUDING page selectors. Recommendation: Limit the page selectors on medium to large lists using the following tips: a) Make the page selector available in one grid and use the synchronized paging option for all other grids and charts. No need to allow users to edit the page in every dashboard grid or chart. b) For multi-level hierarchies, consider creating a separate dashboard with multiple modules (just with the list entries) to enable the users to navigate to the desired level. They can then navigate back to the main planning dashboard. This approach also de-clutters the dashboards. c) If the dashboard elements don't require the use of the list, you should publish them from a module that doesn't contain this list. For example, floating page selectors for time or versions, or grids that are displayed as rows/columns-only should be published from modules that do not include the list. Why? The view definitions for these elements will contain all the source module's dimensions, even if they are not shown, and so will carry the overhead of populating the large page selector if it was present in the source. Rule 5: Split formatted line items into separate modules. Having many line items (that are formatted as lists) in a single module displayed on a dashboard can reduce performance as all of the lists are stored in memory (similar to Rule 4). It is better, if possible, to split the line items into separate modules. Remember from above, try not to have too many components on a dashboard; only include what the users really need and create more dashboards as needed.  
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Overview These dashboards are absolutely critical to good usability of a model. Dashboards are the first contact between the end users and a model. What SHOULD NOT be done in a landing dashboard: Display detailed instructions on how to use the model. See "Instruction Dashboard" instead. Use it for global navigation, built using text boxes and navigation buttons. It will create maintenance challenges if different roles have different navigation paths. It's not helpful once users know where to go. What SHOULD be done in a landing dashboard: Display KPIs with a chart that highlights where they stand on these KPIs, and highlight gaps/errors/exceptions/warnings. A summary/aggregated view of data on a grid to support the chart. The chart should be the primary element. Short instructions on the KPIs. A link to an instruction-based dashboard that includes guidance and video links. A generic instruction to indicate that the user should open the left-side sliding panel to discover the different navigation paths. Users who perform data entry need access to the same KPIs as execs are seeing. Landing dashboard example 1:   Displays the main KPI, which the planning model allows the organization to plan. Landing dashboard example 2:   Provides a view on how the process is progressing against the calendar. Landing dashboard example 3:   Created for executives who need to focus on escalation. Provides context and a call to action (could be a planning dashboard, too).  
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If you’re familiar with Anaplan, you’ve probably heard the buzz about having a data hub and wondered why it’s considered a “best practice” within the Anaplan community. Wonder no more. Below, I will share four reasons why you should spend the time to build a data hub before Anaplan takes your company by storm.   1. Maintain consistent hierarchies Hierarchies are a common list structure built by Anaplan and come in a variety of options depending on use case, e.g., product hierarchy, cost center hierarchy, and management hierarchy, just to name a few. These hierarchies should be consistent across the business whether you’re doing demand planning or financial planning. With a data hub, your organization has a higher likelihood of keeping hierarchies consistent over time since everyone is pulling the same structure from one source of truth: the data hub.   2. Data Optimization As you expand the use of Anaplan across multiple departments, you may find that you only need a portion of a list, rather than the entire list. For instance, you may want the full list of employees for workforce planning purposes, but only a portion of the employees for incentive compensation calculations. With a data hub, you can distribute only the pertinent information. You can filter the list of employees to build the employee hierarchy in the incentive compensation model while having the full list of employees in the workforce planning model. Keep them both in sync using the data hub as your source of truth.   3. Separate duties by roles and responsibilities An increasing number of customers have asked about roles and responsibilities with Anaplan as they expand internally. In Anaplan, we recommend each model have a separate owner. For example, an IT owner for the data hub, an operations owner for the demand planning model, and a finance owner for the financial planning model. The three owners combined would be your Center of Excellence, but each has their separate roles and responsibilities for development and maintenance in the individual models.   4. Accelerate future builds One of the main reasons many companies choose Anaplan is for the platform’s flexibility. Its use can easily and quickly expand across an entire organization. Development rarely stops after the first implementation. Model builders are enabled and excited to continue to bring Anaplan into other areas of the business. If you start by building the data hub as your source of truth for data and metadata, you can accelerate the development of future models since you already have defined the foundation of the model, the lists, and dimensions. As you begin to implement, build, and roll out Anaplan, starting with a data hub is a key consideration. In addition to this, there are many other fundamental Anaplan best practices to consider when rolling out a new technology and driving internal adoption.
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Table of Contents   Overview A data hub is a separate model that holds an organization’s data. Data can be shared with all your models, making expands easier to implement and ensuring data integrity across models. The data hub model can be placed in a different workspace, allowing for role segregation. This allows you to assign administrator rights to users to manage the data hub without allowing those users access to the production models. The method for importing to the data hub (into modules, rather than lists) allows you to reconcile properties using formulas. One type of data hub can be integrated with an organization’s data warehouse and hold ERP, CRM, HR, and other data as shown in this example. Anaplan Data Architecture But this isn’t the only type of data hub. Some organizations may require a data hub for transactional data, such as bookings, pipeline, or revenue. Whether you will be using a single data hub or multiple hubs, it is a good idea to plan your approach for importing from the organization’s systems into the data hub(s) as well as how you will synchronize the imports from the data hub to the appropriate model. The graphic below shows best practices.   High level best practices   When building a data hub, the best practice is to import a list with properties into a module rather than directly into a list. Using this method, you set up line items to correspond with the properties and import them using the text data type. This imports all the data without errors or warnings. The data in the data hub module can be imported to a list in the required model. The exception for importing into a module is if you are using a numbered list without a unique code (or in other words, you are using combination of properties). In that case, you will need to import the properties into the list.   Implementation steps Here are the steps to create the basics of a hub and spoke architecture. 1) Create a model and name it master data hub You can create the data hub in the same workspace where all the other models are, but a better option is to put the data hub in a different workspace. The advantage is role segregation; you can assign administrator rights to users to manage the Hub and not provide them with access to the actual production models, which are in a different workspace. Large customers may require this segregation of duties. Note: This functionality became available in release 2016.2.   2) Import your data files into the data hub Set up your lists. Identify the lists that are required in the data hub. Create these lists using good naming conventions. Set up any needed hierarchies, working from the top level down. Import data into the list from the source files, mapping only the unique name, the parent (if the name rolls up into a hierarchy), and code, if available. Do not import any list properties. These will be imported into a module. Create corresponding modules for those lists that include properties. For each list, create a module. Name the module [List Name] Properties. In the module, create a line item for each property and use the data type TEXT. Import the source file into the corresponding module. There should be no errors or warnings. Automate the process with actions. Each time you imported, an action was created. Name your actions using the appropriate naming conventions. Note: Indicate the name of the source in the name of the import action. To automate the process, you’ll want to create one process that includes all your imports. For hierarchies, it is important to get the actions in the correct order. Start with the highest level of the hierarchy list import, then the next level list and on down the hierarchy. Then add the module imports. (The order of the module imports is not critical.) Now, let's look at an example: You have a four-level hierarchy to load, such as 1) Employee→ 2) State → 3) Region → 4) Country   Lists Create lists with the right naming conventions. For this example, create these lists: G1 Country G2 Region G3 State Employee G4 Set the parent hierarchy to create the composite hierarchy. Import into each list from the source file(s), and only map name and parent. The exception is the employee list, which includes a code (employee ID) which should be mapped. Properties will be added to the data hub later.   Properties → Modules Create one module for each list that includes properties. Name the module [List Name] Properties. For this example, only the Employees list includes properties, so create one module named Employee Properties. In each module, create as many line items as you have properties. For this example, the line items are Salary and Bonus. Open the Blueprint view of the module and in the Format column, select Text. Pivot the module so that the line items are columns. Import the properties. In the grid view of the module, click on the property you are going to import into. Set up the source as a fixed line item. Select the appropriate line item from the Line Item tab and on the Mapping tab, select the correct column for the data values. You’ll need to import each property (line item) separately. There should be no errors or warnings.     Actions  Each time you run an import, an action is created. You can view these actions by selecting Actions from the Model Settings tab. The previous imports into lists and modules have created one import action per list. You can combine these actions into a process that will run each action in the correct order. Name your actions following the naming conventions. Note, the source is included in the action name.   Create one process that includes the imports. Name your process Load [List Name]. Make sure the order is correct: Put the list imports first, starting with the top hierarchy level (numbered as 1) and working down the module imports in any order.   3) Reconcile These list imports should be running with zero errors because imports are going into text formatted items. If some properties should match with items in lists, it's recommended to use FINDITEM formulas to match text to list items: FINDITEM simply looks at the text formatted line item, and finds the match in the list that you specify. Every time data is uploaded into Anaplan, you just need to make sure all items from the text formatted line item are being loaded into the list. This will be useful as you will be able to always compare the "raw data" to the "Anaplan data," and not have to load that data more than once if there are concerns about the data quality in Anaplan. If there is not a list of the properties included in your data hub model, first, create that list. Let’s use the example of Territory. Add a line item to the module and select list as the format type, then select the list name of your list of properties—in this case, Territory from the drop-down. Add the FINDITEM formula FINDITEM(x,y) where x is the name of your list (Territory for our example) and y is the line item. You can then filter this line item so that it shows all of the blank items. Correct the data in the source system. If you will be importing frequently, you may want to set up a dashboard to allow users to view the data so they can make corrections in the source system. Set up a saved view for the errors and add conditional formatting to highlight the missing (blank items) data. You can also include a counter to show the number of errors and add that information to the dashboard.   4) Split models: Filter and Set up Saved Views If the architecture of your model includes spoke models by regions, you need one master hierarchy that covers all regions and a corresponding module that stores the properties. Use that module and create as many saved views as you have spoke region models. For example, filter on Country GI = Canada if you want to import only Canadian accounts into the spoke model. You will need to create a saved view for each hierarchy and spoke model.   5) Import to the spoke module Use the cross-workspace imports if you have decided to put your Master data hub in a separate workspace. Create the lists that correspond to the hierarchy levels in each spoke model. There is no way to create a list via import for now. Create the properties in the list where needed. Keep in mind that the import of properties into the data hub as line items is an exception. List properties generally do not vary, unlike a line item in a module, which are often measured over time. Note: Properties can also be housed in modules and there are some benefits to this. See Anapedia - Model Building (specifically, the "List Attributes" and "List attributes in a module" topics). If you decide to use a module to hold the properties, you will need to create a line item for each property type and then import the properties into the module. To simplify the mapping, make sure the property names in each spoke model match the line item names of the data hub model. In each spoke model, create an import from the filtered module view of the data hub model into the lists you created in step 1. In the Actions window, name your imports using naming conventions. Create a process that includes these actions (imports). Begin with the highest level in the hierarchy and work down to the lowest. Well done! You have imported your hierarchy from a data hub model.   6) Incremental list imports When you are in the midst of your peak planning cycle and your large lists are changing frequently, you’ll want to update the data hub and push the changes to the spoke models. Running imports of several thousand list members, may cause performance issues and block users during the import activity. In a best case scenario, your data warehouse provides a date field that shows when the item was added or modified, and is able to deliver a flat file or table that includes only the changes. Your import into the HUB model will just take few seconds, and you can filter on this date field to only export the changes to the spoke models. But in most cases, all you have is a full list from the data warehouse, regardless of what has changed. To mitigate this, we'll use a technique to export only the list items that have changed (edited, deleted, updated) since the last export, using the logic in Anaplan.   Setting up the incremental loads: In the data hub model: Create a text formatted line item in your module. Name it CHECKSUM, set the format as Text, and enter a formula to concatenate of all the properties that you want to track changes for. These properties will form the base of the incremental import. Example: CHECKSUM = State & Segment & Industry & Parent & Zip Code Create a second line item, name it CHECKSUM OLD, set the format as Text, and create an import that imports CHECKSUM into CHEKSUM_OLD. Ignore any other mappings. Name this import: 1/2 im DELTA and put it in a process called "RESET DELTA" Create a line item and name it "DELTA" and set the format as Boolean. Enter this formula: IF CHECKSUM <> CHECKSUM OLD THEN TRUE ELSE FALSE. Update the filtered view that you created to export only the hierarchy for a specific region or geography. Add a filter criteria "DELTA = true". You will only see the list items which differ from the last time you imported into the data hub In the example above, we'll import into a spoke model only the list items that are in US East, and that have changed since the last import. Execute the import from the source into the data hub and then into the spoke models. In the data hub model, upload the new files and run the process import. In the spoke models, run the process import that takes the list from the data hub's filtered view. → Check the import logs and verify that only the number of items that have changed are actually imported. Back in the data hub model, run the RESET DELTA process (1/2 im DELTA import). The RESET DELTA process resets the changes, so you are ready for the next set of changes. Your source, data hub model and spoke models are all in sync. 7) Incremental data load The Actual transaction file might need to be imported several times into the data hub model and from there into the spoke models during the planning peak cycle. If the file is large, it can create performance issues for end users. Since not all transactions will change as the data is imported several times a day, there is a strong opportunity to optimize this process. In the data hub model transaction module, create the same CHECKSUM, CHECKSUM OLD and DELTA line items. CHECKSUM should concatenate all the fields you want to track the delta on, including the values. "DELTA" line item will actually catch new transactions, as well as modified transactions. See 6. Incremental List Imports above for more information   Filter the view using DELTA to only import transaction list items into the list, and the actuals transaction into the module. Create an import from CHECKSUM to CHECKSUM OLD, to be able to reset the delta after the imports have run, name this import: 2/2 im DELTA, and add it to the DELTA process created for the list. In the spoke model, import into the transaction list and into the transaction module, from the transaction filtered view. Run the DELTA import or process.   😎  Automation You can semi-automate this process and have it run automatically on a frequent basis if incremental loads have been implemented. That provides immediacy of master data and actuals across all models during a planning cycle. It's semi-automatic because it requires a review of the reconciliation dashboards before pushing the data to the spoke models. There are a few ways to automate, all requiring an external tool: Anaplan Connect or the customer's ETL. The automation script needs to execute in this order: Connect to the master data hub model. Load the external files into the master data hub model. Execute the process that imports the list into the data hub. Execute the process that imports actuals (transactions) into the data hub. Manual step: Open your reconciliation dashboards, and check that data and the list are clean. Again, these imports should run with zero errors or warnings. Connect to the spoke model. Execute the list import process. Execute the transaction import models. Repeat 5, 6, and 7 for all spoke models. Connect to the master data hub model. Run the Clear DELTA process to reset the incremental checks.   Other best practices Create deletes for all your lists Create a module called Clear Lists. In the module, create a line item of type Boolean in the module where you have list and properties, call it "CLEAR ALL" and set a formula to TRUE. In Actions, create a "delete from list using selection" action and set it as below: Repeat this for all lists and create one process that executes all these delete actions.   Example of a maintenance/reconcile dashboard Use a maintenance/reconcile dashboard when manual operations are required to update applications from the hub. One method that works well is to create a module that highlights if there are errors in each data source. In that module, create a line item message that displays on the dashboard if there are errors, for example: There are errors that need correcting. A link on this dashboard to the error status page will make it easy for users to check on errors. A best practice is to automate the list refresh. Combine this with a modeling solution that only exports what has changed.   Dev-test-prod considerations There should be two saved views: One for development and one for production. That way, the hub can feed the development models with shortened versions of the lists and the production models will get the full lists. ALM considerations: The development (DEV) model will need the imports set up for DEV and production (PROD) if the different saved view option is taken. The additional ALM consideration is that the lists that are imported into the spoke models from the hub need to be marked as production data.   Development DATA HUB The data hub houses all global data needed to execute the Anaplan use case. The data hub often houses complex calculations and readies data for downstream models. DEVELOPMENT MODEL The development model is built to the 80/20 rule. It is built upon a global process, regional specific functionality is added in the deployment phase. The model is built to receive data from the data hub. DATA INTEGRATION During this stage, Anaplan Connect or a 3rd party tool is used to automate data integration. Data feeds are built from the source system into the data hub and from the data hub to downstream models. PERFORMANCE TESTING The application is put through rigorous performance testing, including automated and end user testing. These tests mimic real world usage and exceptionally heavy traffic to see how the system will perform.   Deployment DATA HUB The data hub is refreshed with the latest information from the source systems. The data hub readies data for downstream models. DEPLOYMENT  MODEL The development model is copied and the appropriate data is loaded from the data hub. Regional specific functionality is added during this phase. DATA INTEGRATION Additional data feeds from the data hub to downstream models are finalized. The integrations are tested and timed to establish baseline SLA. Automatic feeds are placed on timed schedules to keep the data up to date. PERFORMANCE TESTING The application is again put through rigorous performance testing.   Expansion DATA HUB The need for additional data for new use cases is often handled by splitting the data hub into regional data hubs. This helps the system perform more efficiently. MODEL  DEVELOPMENT The models built for new use cases are developed and thoroughly tested. Additional functionality can be added to the original models deployed. DATA INTEGRATION Data integration is updated to reflect the new system architecture. Automatic feeds are tested and scheduled according to business needs. PERFORMANCE TESTING At each stage, the application is put through rigorous performance testing. These tests mimic real world usage and exceptionally heavy traffic to see how the system will perform.
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Problem to solve: As an HR manager, I need to enter the salary raise numbers for multiple regions that I'm responsible for. As a domain best practice, my driver-based model helps me to enter raise guidelines, which will then change at the employee level. Usability issue addressed: I have ten regions, eight departments in each, with a total of 10,000+ employees. I need to align my bottom-up plan to the down target I received earlier. I need to quickly identify what region is above/behind target and address the variance. My driver-based raise modeling is fairly advanced, and I need to see what the business rules are. I need to quickly see how it impacts the employee level. Call to action: Step 1: Spot what region I need to address.  Step 2: Drill into the variances by department. Steps 1 & 2 are analytics steps: "As an end user, I focus first on where the biggest issues are." This is a good usability practice that helps users. Step 3: Adjusting the guidelines (drivers) There are not excessive instructions on how to build and use guidelines, which would have cluttered the dashboard. Instead, Anaplan added a "view guideline instruction" button. This button should open a dashboard dedicated to detailed instructions or link to a video that explains how guideline works. Impact analysis: The chart above the grid will adjust as guidelines are edited. That is a good practice for impact analysis— no scrolling or clicking needed to view how the changes will impact the plan. Step 4: Review a summary of the variance after changes are made. Putting steps 1–4 close to each other is a usable way of indicating to a user that he/she needs to iterate through these four steps to achieve their objective, which is to have every region and every department be within the top down target. Step 5: A detailed impact analysis, which is placed directly below steps 3 and 4. This allows end users to drill into the employee-level details and view the granular impact of the raise guidelines. Notice the best practices in step 5:   The customer will likely ask to see 20 to 25 employee KPIs across all employees and will be tempted to display these as one large grid. This can quickly lead to an unusable grid made of thousands of rows (employees) across 25 columns. Instead, we have narrowed the KPI list to only ten that display without left-right scrolling. Criteria to elect these ten: be able to have a chart that compares employees by these KPIs. The remaining KPIs are displayed as an info grid, which only displays values for the selected employee. Things like region, zip codes, and dates are removed from the grid as they do not need to be compared side-by-side with other KPIs or between employees.  
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Learn how to organize your model into logical parts to give you a  well-designed model that is easy to follow, understand and amend at a later date
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This article provides the steps needed to create a basic time filter module. This module can be used as a point of reference for time filters across all modules and dashboards within a given model. The benefits of a centralized Time Filter module include: One centralized governance of time filters. Optimization of workspace, since the filters do not need to be re-created for each view. Instead, use the Time Filter module. Conforms with the D.I.S.C.O. methodology as a 'System' module.  More on D.I.S.C.O. can be found here.   Step 1: Create a new module with two dimensions—time and line items. The example below has simple examples for Weeks Only, Months Only, Quarters Only, and Years Only. Step 2: Line items should be Boolean formatted and the time scale should be set in accordance to the scale identified in the line item name. The example below also includes filters with and without summary methods, providing additional views depending on the level of aggregation desired. Once your preliminary filters are set, your module will look something like the screenshot below.  Step 3: Use the pre-set Time Filters across various modules and dashboards. Simply click on the filters icon in the toolbar, navigate to the time tab, select your Time Filter module from the module selection screen, and select the line item of your choosing. Use multiple line items at a time to filter your module or dashboard view.  
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Assume the following Non-Composite list, ragged hierarchy, needs to be set to Production Data. We need to refer to the ultimate parent to define the logic calculation. In the example, we have assumed that children of Parent 1 and Parent 3 need to return the 'logic 1' value from the constants module below, and those under Parent 2 return 'logic 2,' and we apportion the results based on the initial data of the children. Select Proportion: Data / IF PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 1' THEN Data[SELECT: 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 1'] ELSE IF PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 2' THEN Data[SELECT: 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 2'] ELSE IF PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 3' OR PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Child 3.1' THEN Data[SELECT: 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 3'] ELSE 0   Select Calculation: Select Proportion * IF PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 1' OR PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 3' OR PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Child 3.1' THEN Parent Logic Constants.'Logic 1' ELSE IF PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) = 'Non-Composite List'.'Parent 2' THEN Parent Logic Constants.'Logic 2' ELSE 0   These “hard references” will prevent the list from being set as a production list. SOLUTION: Create a Parents Only list (this could be imported from the Non-Composite list).  As we don't need the sub-level parents, we do not need to include 'Child 3.1,' even though it is technically a parent. To calculate the proportion calculation without the SELECT, a couple of intermediate modules are needed:   Parent Mapping module This module maps the Non-Composite parents to the Parents Only list.  Due to the different levels in the hierarchy, we need to check for sub levels and use the parent of Child 3.1. In this example, the mapping is automatic because the items in the Parents Only list have the same name as those in the Non-Composite list. The mapping could be a manual entry if needed.   The formula and “applies to” are:   Non Composite Parent: PARENT(ITEM('Non-Composite List')) Applies to: Non-Composite List   Parent of Non Composite Parent: PARENT(Non-Composite Parent) Applies to: Non-Composite List   Parent to Map: IF ISNOTBLANK(PARENT(Parent of Non Composite Parent)) THEN Parent of Non Composite Parent ELSE Non Composite Parent Applies to: Non-Composite List    Parents Only List FINDITEM(Parents Only List, NAME(Parent to Map)) Applies to: Parents Only List   Parents Only subtotals An intermediary module is needed to hold the subtotals. Calculation: Parent Logic Calc.Data[SUM: Parent Mapping.Parents Only List]   Parent Logic? Module We now define the logic for the parents in a separate module. Add Boolean line items for each of the “logic” types. Then you can refer to the logic above  in the calculations. Lookup Proportion: Data / Parents Only Subtotals.Calculation[LOOKUP: Parent Mapping.Parents Only List]   Lookup Calculation: Lookup Proportion * IF Parent Logic?.'Logic 1?'[LOOKUP: Parent Mapping.Parents Only List] THEN Parent Logic Constants.'Logic 1' ELSE IF Parent Logic?.'Logic 2?'[LOOKUP: Parent Mapping.Parents Only List] THEN Parent Logic Constants.'Logic 2' ELSE 0 The list can now be set as a production list as there are no “hard references”.  Also, the formulas are smaller, simpler and now more flexible should the logic need to change.  If Parent 3 needs to use Logic 2, it is a simple change to the checkbox.     Appendix: Blueprints:      
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