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To ensure your success as a Content Contributor, please complete the following steps: Read the Expectations of Content Contributors. Subscribe to updates from the Content Sandbox and the Content Toolkit Knowledge Base. This will ensure you receive notifications when reviewers leave comments on your articles or when new information is posted in the knowledge base. (To subscribe, click the Options menu in the top right of each of those pages, and select Subscribe in each one.) Subscribe to the Content Requests thread in the  Content Discussion Board to ensure you know when we receive a content request in your area of expertise. Familiarize yourself with the Style Guide Quick Reference Summary. Make sure you understand the process of creating an article.  Update your Community profile with a current photo and brief bio (guide here).  Visit the discussion board and introduce yourself. Welcome aboard! The Anaplan Community team is excited  that you have decided to help contribute to this growing destination for all things planning!
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The Community team relies on passionate, committed, knowledgable content creators to help ensure the ongoing growth of the Anaplan Community as a valuable resource for customers, partners, employees, and anyone interested in connected planning. Content Contributors on the Anaplan Community play a very important role in ensuring there is always fresh, relevant content for members and visitors. As such, there are some basic expectations for those with this role: Specific knowledge.   Content Contributors each offer something unique—a perspective, skill set, level of experience, or other knowledge that most others probably don't share. As a Content Contributor, you must have a specific topic (or topics) in mind that you wish to create content for and be qualified to address that topic.  Adherence to process. In addition to observing the Community House Rules required of all members, please familiarize yourself with and follow the Community   style guides   and   best practices in your content creation. If it would be helpful, please use the provided templates to help with consistency. Help maintain a high level of professional-quality content that can help the Community continue to be a major differentiator for Anaplan. Regular contribution.   In addition to having an idea for your first content contribution, you must be willing and able to continue to contribute on an ongoing basis. Be engaged! Write an article or process guide, record a video, or even just interact with other users regularly. However, please contribute something every 60 days (at least!) in order to maintain your Content Contributor status.  Help others.   In addition to contributing regular content, please be (at least somewhat) active on the Content Contributor discussion board. Help other contributors workshop their ideas, stay on top of content news and tips, and collaborate with others on creating amazing content. Have fun.   There's a lot happening on the Anaplan Community, and we're excited to have you with us!
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While all content contributors and content managers should familiarize themselves with the full style guide, this Quick Reference Summary offers a broad overview and examples of best practices. The Community team recommends printing or bookmarking the summary for easy access when authoring content. Be objective. State real facts and back them up. If you're offering an opinion, make sure you label it as such and say whose opinion it is. Bad: The financial services industry is known to comply with the most complex regulations in the world. Good: By one count, banks must track an average of 200 regulatory revisions globally per day. (Include link to research.) Be human. Write for real people. Be interesting. Reflect what's important to your reader. Bad: BigCorp, Inc., created a Center of Excellence. Good: Jane Doe of BigCorp, Inc., created and led a Center of Excellence. Be concise. Don’t waste the reader's time. Make every sentence count. Avoid wordiness and excessive flourishes or color. (The average reader reads at an eighth-grade level.) Bad: The sales team is equipped to carry out a more responsive sales process. Good: The sales team can respond faster. Avoid first person. Avoid “I/me” references; use "we/us." (E.g., "we recommend" or "contact us.") Write for “you.” (E.g., “you should do this” or “next, you will click that.”) Get active. Choose the active voice ("Rita did this") over the passive ("This was done by Rita," or worse, "This was done"). Avoid starting sentences with "There is," "there are," "this is," "it is," and similar phrases. Bad: The platform will be updated. Good: Anaplan will update the platform. Choose strong verbs. Use verbs specific to the action. Bad: Anaplan will be having a User Group Meetup. Good: Anaplan will host a User Group Meetup. Help your reader. Keep it simple. Make sure one idea flows into the next logically. Bad: Anaplan is committed to exceeding your expectations for support during all interactions with our employees and our software, because your success is our success. Good: Your success is our success, and we are committed to supporting you. Use Anaplan-preferred terminology. Become familiar with Anaplan’s preferred spelling, capitalization, and punctuation for frequently-used terms. (E.g., “end user,” not “end-user;” “Center of Excellence,” not “CoE;” etc. Do not capitalize terms like “module,” “model,” etc.) Reference the full word list if you have questions. If the word list does not address your question, please notify Community@anaplan.com. Always write in present tense, unless specifically referencing past events Bad: The process was designed to illustrate how... Good: The process illustrates how... Use correct punctuation. Do not use a double space between sentences. Punctuation always goes within quotation marks. 
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Tone Our words should convey facts, make an emotional impact, and motivate people to act. Our writing reflects on Anaplan's credibility; the tone we seek is professional, knowledgeable, and respectful, and the copy should be easy and pleasant to read. Following are some ideas that can help you achieve our desired tone. When you write ask yourself four questions: Who am I writing for? You'll write differently for a C-level executive than for an end user than for an IT professional. Write for your audience—but no matter who you're writing for, don't get bogged down in jargon or try to show off. What do I want to say? If you can't articulate the core of your message in a sentence or two, refine your idea. Why am I writing this? Put another way: What do you want your reader to do? How will my audience receive the message? A discussion post, a known issue item, and a process guide will all have a different tone. Make sure your message is appropriate for the medium. Key Guidelines While all content contributors and content managers should familiarize themselves with the full style guide below, the Quick Reference Summary offers a broad overview and examples of best practices. The Community team recommends printing or bookmarking the summary for easy access when authoring content. References Style: AP Style. Limited online content can be found at this source. Bound copies of the AP Stylebook are available. See Exceptions to AP Style for details on where we diverge. Word list: If you have questions about Anaplan-specific words or terms (spelling, usage, punctuation, etc.) start by referencing the style guide word list. If a word is not covered specifically in the word list, refer to the resources below. Contact community@anaplan.com with any questions. Dictionary: Merriam-Webster. Online at this site. Additional style reference: The New York Times. If a word or phrase you want to use is not covered by AP Style or Merriam-Webster, search the paper's website and follow the form they use. Bonus: though it's now inactive, the paper's After Deadline blog is a lively source of information. Additional style reference: Chicago Manual of Style for citations only. See the Statistics and Citations section for details. Specific Guidelines The Anaplan Name The company is Anaplan, not Anaplan Inc. The technology is the Anaplan platform or Anaplan's platform whenever possible. Do not capitalize the word platform. Addresses For U.S. addresses, use postal codes for states (CA, TX, NY, etc.). This is an exception from AP style. Use no state for cities on AP's dateline list. American English Use American English spelling, grammar, and punctuation rules in all English-language materials, unless a piece is written by an EMEA/APAC resident for an all-EMEA/APAC audience. In that case, UK English rules apply; see the UK English section below. Analysts Specific rules apply when referring to analyst firms (such as Gartner and Forrester). While you can refer to their citation policies (Gartner and Forrester), it's often fastest and best to contact Analyst Relations (ir@anaplan.com before you proceed. Absolutes and Superlatives Avoid best, only, fastest, unique, impossible, always, and other words and phrases that indicate something with no alternative or that we can't prove. Bold and Italics Use italics for: Emphasis—but use sparingly. Captions for images in blogs. Complete titles of books. Newspaper and magazine titles. Examples: Financial Times and Newsweek. Click-to-tweet words in blogs. To identify words and phrases used as examples, as we do in this style guide. Use bold type for: Subheads. (Design will format these in most cases) Lead-off phrases in bullet lists. (This blog has an example.) Cross-references to subheads, as we do in this style guide. Calls to Action Our calls to action (CTAs) should be direct, polite, and informative. In blogs, choose between two formats: Visual CTAs consist of a logo, the name of the asset, and a button with a two-word request (examples: Read report, Watch webinar, View infographic). Text CTAs can be more verbose and descriptive but should still make clear what we want the reader to do. Example: Explore the full event agenda and register today. For related information, see the Links section below. Capitalization Capitalize sparingly. When in doubt, do not capitalize. For usages that fall under other categories in this style guide, please check the guidelines for those categories (e.g., Lists, Names and Titles, etc.). Reference the word list for specific terms.  In general, do not capitalize topics of discussion (e.g., data integration, calculation functions) unless referencing specific sections of the Community (e.g., Data Integration, Calculation Functions). Do not capitalize elements of the Anaplan platform (e.g., modules, models, functions, fields) unless what you are referencing has a specific proper name. Use sentence case for: H2 and H3 subheadings in articles and posts Links Sentences (of course) Use title case for (to decide which words to capitalize, use this   title case checker): Titles of posts and articles Headings within articles and posts (H1 only) Session names and agenda items Calls to action Column and row headers in tables Use all capital letters only for abbreviations and acronyms (but check the   word list). Do not use all caps for emphasis. (Use italics for emphasis, but do so sparingly.) If a company name is all lowercase or all uppercase letters, follow their style, even at the beginning of sentences.   Examples: DISH   and   bluecrux. Use initial capitals for Anaplan solutions.   Example: Anaplan for Financial Services In the flow of text, do not capitalize industries   (financial services)   or lines of business   (supply chain). Companies vs. People Companies aren't people, so use the singular impersonal pronoun its when speaking of one company, not the personal pronouns they or their. Example: "Deloitte released its latest app," not "Deloitte released their latest app." When you're speaking of multiple companies, they and their are acceptable. Example: "Deloitte and Anaplan presented their vision for connected planning." Check the names of companies—customers in particular—with the team in customer marketing if you're not sure of the spelling or format. If an individual's gender is clear, use his or her as the pronoun as appropriate. If it's not clear, the singular they and their are acceptable. Grammar nerds, read on. Community Content Creation There should only be one author per article; the SME needs to be the star. Editors, Content Managers, and Admins need to remove their names as contributors when creating or updating content on behalf of a SME. Use the included attachment function to include files with any article. Do not use links to external sites like Box. Authors are responsible for maintaining their attachments. Currency U.S. dollars: Use the $ sign and decimal point for amounts over one dollar: $1.01, $2.50. To distinguish the nationality of dollars, use the appropriate ISO codes (USD, CAD, AUD) after the number. Example: $4 million USD. For euros, spell out lower case if it does not start a sentence. Do not use the euro symbol (€). Example: He paid me 12 euros. For Japanese yen, spell out the currency, lower case: Example: 100 yen. Cents: Never use the cent sign (¢). Instead, spell out the word cents and use numerals for amounts less than a dollar: 5 cents, 12 cents. For related information see the Numbers section, below. Dashes and Hyphens Hypens (-) are used between some words and their prefixes and suffixes (always check the dictionary and word list) and in most cases when two or three words are used as an adjective. Do not put a space on either side of the hyphen. Example of a prefix: co-branding Example of a two-word adjective: decision-making power Example of a three-word adjective: off-balance-sheet accounting A hyphen is not needed in a two-word adjective in which the first word ends with ly. Example: "commonly held belief." Em dashes (—) cause the reader to pause, and are used for parenthetical statements (in which case they can often be replaced by parentheses or commas) or to emphasize specific words or phrases. Do not put a space on either side of the em dash. To make one on a Mac: shift-option-hyphen. Example of a parenthetical: The em dash is a mark that—unlike commas, periods, semicolons and all the others—doesn't seem to be subject to any rules. (The New York Times is the source of that example.) Example of emphasis: "Provide captions for images used in blogs, white papers, and data sheets—but not for banners." En dashes (–) are used to indicate spans of numbers, dates, or time. An en dash is also used when a multiple-word phrase is used as a modifier. Do not put a space on either side of the en dash. To make one on a Mac: option-hyphen. Example of a span: "I'll be out of the office Tuesday–Friday." Example of a multiple-word modifier: "bill of materials–based budgeting." For more about dashes and hyphens, read this. Dates and Times Use the month, date, year format for dates: July 27, 2017. Use numbers only, not ordinals, for dates: July 11, not July 11th or July 11th. Use this format for time: 12:30 p.m., not 12:30pm or 12:30 PM. For content targeted at a non-U.S. audience, you may use this date format (with no punctuation): 27 July 2017. Use a 24-hour clock for times outside of North America. Do not use a.m. or p.m. Indicate a time zone when you decide it's necessary. Do not use a time zone in the title/headline of event pages (because the city is noted). The time zone may be used in event details. Time zone specifics: In the U.S., use PT, MT, CT, ET (and do not denote standard vs. daylight savings time). For the UK, use GMT. For Europe, use CET. Consult this site for other time zone abbreviations. Use an en dash for date and time ranges. Example of a date range: June 7–9. Example of a time range: 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Avoid using year numbers (2016, 2017, etc.) when it would make content seem dated. Year numbers should never appear in headlines, but may be used in event details. Always use the full year when discussing Hub. When writing a month and year only, do not add a comma. Example: June 2017. For centuries, use ordinals but not superscripts. Example: 20th century. Be specific when referring to dates and times. Example: "June 2017," not "last June." Example: 2014, not "three years ago." Avoid vague terms like "recent" and "soon." If a.m. or p.m. is at the end of a sentence, use only one period. Email Addresses and Messaging Email addresses should always be hyperlinked. Email addresses should always be an organization's email (support@, community@, techops@, etc.), never that of a single user (joe.smith@, sally.sue@, etc.). If an individual author wishes to invite users to contact them, they should utilize the Community messaging system. Exceptions to AP Style We diverge from AP Style in a few specific instances. They're noted throughout this style guide, and we've collected them here as well. Use the serial (or Oxford) comma—that is, the comma before and in a list of three or more things. Example: The Anaplan platform connects data, people, and plans. A person's title is capitalized, whether before or after the name. Use a person's full name on first use; in subsequent references, use the person's first name only. En dashes (–) are used to indicate spans of numbers, dates, or time. Do not use hyphens. An en dash is also used when a multiple-word phrase is used as a modifier. Example: "bill of materials–based budgeting." Use postal codes for U.S. states (CA, TX, NY, etc.). See the Addresses section above. Headlines and Subheads (Display Type) Article and blog titles, headlines, decks, and subheads should be in title case. Event agendas are in title case. To decide which words to capitalize, use the title case checker. Use punctuation sparingly in headlines and subheads. Do not use ending punctuation Headlines and subheads should be grammatical but do not need to be as perfectly so as body copy. Headlines and subheads should be interesting, fun to read, and clever (in good taste). Most of all, headlines and subheads should encourage the reader to continue reading. Never use a hashtag in a headline, as it can break social sharing plug-ins Use digits for numbers (even for numbers less than 10) in display type See related information in the Capitalization section above. Images Images should be used to add helpful, interesting content to written pieces. If an image is just eye candy, delete it. Provide captions for images used in blogs, white papers, and data sheets—but not for banners. Captions should encourage the reader to look at the image and help the reader see what's important. Example: The three tabs in the user interface—dogs, cats, and mice—each provide information tailored to a specific audience. For each image, include alt text that describes the image. Alt text is helpful for the visually impaired and in cases where images do not load. If the image is a call to action, the alt text can be that call to action. Example: Download the white paper. Kudos Kudos should always be capitalized when referring to Community Kudos (the built-in upvoting feature) Kudos should always be used in the plural (always as Kudos, never Kudo) Usage should be along the lines of give Kudos to this article or leaving Kudos on a post, not leave a Kudos or give a Kudo (think about the phrase giving props and use Kudos the same way) Lists Use numbers for lists of items that must be performed in sequence. Use bullets for lists that do not need to be presented in order. (The list you're reading is an example.) Give bullet lists in order of logic or importance, if possible. If all items in a list are equal, consider alphabetizing the list. Do not create a bullet list with just one bullet. Make all items in a list grammatically consistent. For example, begin all items with a verb (as in the list you're reading), and don't mix sentences and fragments. If a list flows directly out of an introductory paragraph, make sure that all items flow logically and grammatically from the introduction. Capitalize and punctuate lists consistently. Capitalize the first word of every list item, whether it is a sentence or a fragment. If list items are full sentences, end each item with appropriate punctuation. (The list you're reading is an example of this.) If each item in an agenda can flow into the next, end each item with a comma and do not capitalize the individual list items. See the first list in the Numbers section below for an example of this. (In that example, because one list item includes commas, each item ends in a semicolon.) If list items are single words or ideas, final punctuation may not be necessary. (The list under Capitalization above is an example.) Use this format for in-line numbered lists: This has two benefits: 1) first benefit; and 2) second benefit. Links Avoid generic calls to action (such as "click here," "find out more," and "learn more"). Write short, descriptive text (fewer than five words) saying where the link leads. Example: "Next page," not "To go to the next page, click here." Mirror the heading text on the destination page in links whenever possible. Note a benefit in buttons and links. Example: "Start your free trial" rather than using the word submit. Include SEO words in the link text when possible. Don't include the ending punctuation (periods, question marks, exclamation points) in the link. Do not make link text italics or bold, unless it would be so as normal body copy. Do not use URLs (https://www.anaplan.com or anaplan.com) as links. Names and Titles Use a person's full name and title on first use. Titles are initial-capped, whether they are before or after the individual's name. (This is an exception to AP Style.) Example: Frank Calderoni, Chief Executive Officer of Anaplan. In subsequent references, use the person's first name only. Do not capitalize a title when it appears in the flow of a sentence, unassociated with a name. Example: "As Anaplan's head of supply chain solutions, I talk with logistics managers every day." Only use Dr. before a name if the person is a medical doctor. Avoid adding degrees (such as PhD) after a person's name unless the person insists. Numbers Related guidance can be found in the Date and Time and Currency sections above. Use numerals when a number is greater than 10; for amounts less than one dollar; in headlines; for years; for ages; for coordinates, page numbers, and line references; when a passage contains at least two numbers and at least one is 10 or greater. Use ordinals for street names (42nd Street) but do not use superscripts for ordinals. Use, and write out, ordinals (fourth, seventy-seventh) in spoken pieces such as speeches and voiceovers. Spell out numbers less than 10 or when the first word of a sentence, except in headlines and artwork. For numbers larger than 999,999, use numerals and follow with million, billion, etc. Always use a hyphen when writing out a number that includes two words. Example: seventy-one. Use a comma between every three digits of long numbers, counting from the right, and a period for the decimal point. This rule does not apply to years. We follow U.S. rules, but read this article for an international perspective. Do not use superscripts for ordinals. If you must use an ordinal, use full-size letters. Example: 20th, not 20 th For U.S. phone numbers, use this format: 123 123 1234 ext.12. Do not include a country code (+1) unless you anticipate an international audience. For phone numbers outside of the U.S., match the country's spacing format, always using spaces (not hyphens, periods, or parentheses) to mark number groups. Past vs. Present Tense When you describe an event that happened in the past, as when writing an event or webinar recap, use past tense. This includes the quotes in your description. Punctuation Colons: Use colons to introduce lists, to introduce explanations, or for emphasis. Capitalize the first word after a colon only if it starts a complete sentence or is a proper noun. Example of introducing a list: There were three considerations: expense, time, and feasibility. Example of introducing an explanation: Example of emphasis: He promised this: The company will be successful. Commas: Use the serial (or Oxford) comma—that is, the comma before and in a list of three or more things. This is an exception to AP Style. Example: "The Anaplan platform connects data, people, and plans." Comma splice: Avoid connecting two sentences that have different subjects with a comma. For example, write "I didn't like the movie. It was way too long," not "I didn't like the movie, it was way too long." (The subject of the first sentence is I, but the subject of the second sentence is the movie.) Dashes: See the Dashes and Hyphens section above. Ellipses: Use an ellipsis (…) to indicate deleted words, but not to denote pauses. Use one space on either side of an ellipsis. Exclamation points: Refrain from using them. Never use more than one per email or paragraph. Periods: Use periods at the end of full sentences. Use one space after a period. Do not double space after a period. Semicolons: Use semicolons to separate elements of a series when one or more segments of the series contain a comma. Example: I watched three movies: Love, Actually; Cars; and Toy Story. Pronouns When using pronouns (such as that, which, it, they, who, etc.), always be completely clear what the pronoun refers to. (That's the pronoun's antecedent.) If there's any ambiguity—any question of "What does it refer to in this sentence?"—then reword. Quotes Use quotation marks only for direct quotes. Do not use them to call attention to words or phrases. Example: don't say this is a "free" trial. Set off full-sentence quotes with a comma. Example: "I am surprised and pleased by the outcome," Scott said. Do not use a comma to set off a partial quote. Example: Scott said he was "surprised and pleased by the outcome." Use single quote marks for quotes within quotes. Example: "When Henry told me, 'I don't want to read the style guide,' I believed him," Fred said. Punctuation always goes within quotation marks. See above examples. Social Media On social media—LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, and other platforms—be: A brand advocate: Share marketing-approved materials and news about Anaplan from your personal social media accounts. Authentic: Don't use the Anaplan name or logo in your profile name or picture. If you engage in a conversation about Anaplan online, disclose that you work for the company and that your views are your own. Respectful: Do not engage with social media trolls. Do not reference customers, shareholders, or partners without their permission. Do not post on social media: Confidential business information. Anything about an Anaplan IPO or related topics, including statements that Anaplan is engaging in or discussing a potential IPO. Anaplan's valuation, current or future. Potential market size for Anaplan's offerings. Forward-looking financial or operational metrics. For example, do not share information about job openings until they are made public. Statistics and Citations Always cite sources when quoting statistics. Do not use sources over three years old except to set historical context. Cite statistics using footnotes in white papers, e-books, and other materials to be printed. Follow the Chicago Manual of Style for footnote formats. Cite statistics using links in digital materials. See the Links section above. Avoid using the words stat or stats to refer to statistics. Symbols Ampersand: Do not use the ampersand (&) in place of the word and except when the ampersand is part of a company's formal name (example: Legal & General), in an abbreviation from our word list (example: S&OP), or in tweets and ads when space is at a premium. Percent: Write out percent (one word) when it appears in a sentence. Use the percent symbol (%) in headlines, labels, infographics, imagery, tweets, ads, and other places where space is at a premium. Technical Considerations On the Community, do not use any Registered (®) or Trademark (™) symbols for official references to products, services, or companies. File types, when used in the flow of a sentence, should be all lowercase, preceded by a period. Examples: .csv, .exe, .docx, etc. When giving a menu path in documentation steps, use carats between steps and bold the entire path. Example: File > Share > Email Link). When referencing a button or link that a user should click on, the link text should be bold (Example: In the top-right corner of the knowledge base, click Create an article.) UK English When a piece is written in English by an EMEA/APAC resident for an EMEA/APAC audience, UK English spelling, grammar, and punctuation can apply. Here are some specifics: Spelling: Certain words end in -ise instead of -ize. Example: humanise vs. humanize. Certain words end in -our instead of -or. Example: humour vs. humor. Certain words use two L's instead of one. Examples: modelling and cancelling vs. modeling and canceling. Per cent is written as two words. Grammar: A collective noun (such as company, team, and group) takes a plural verb in UK English. Example: "The team are winning," not "The team is winning." Dashes: In place of an em dash, use an en dash with spaces on either side. Quotations: Use single quotation marks (an apostrophe in the U.S.) to denote quotes. Anaplan Leaders When referring to Anaplan leaders, get their titles right, and keep them consistent. Name Position Bio on website? Frank Calderoni President and CEO Yes Anup Singh Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer Yes Michael Gould Founder Yes Marilyn Miller Chief People Officer Yes Simon Tucker Chief Customer Officer Yes Maria Pergolino Chief Marketing Officer Yes Steven Birdsall Chief Revenue Officer Yes Sampath Gomatam Vice President, Product Management Yes Jack Whyte Global Vice President of Engineering Yes
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This list exists to provide a single source of truth for official preferred spellings and usage for Anaplan-related words and phrases as well as abbreviations, acronyms, and various other business and technical terms. This list is likely not exhaustive, and as such will grow and change over time. If you have questions or if the word list does not address a particular need, please email community@anaplan.com. The Anaplan acronym dictionary is a helpful resource for understanding acronyms, but some of its examples are not appropriate for use in general public-facing copy. Click the letter below to be taken directly to that section: #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z # 24/7 not 24x7 or 24-7 50-50 not 50/50 A ad hoc an adverb without a hyphen, as in Decisions were made ad hoc. ad-hoc an adjective with a hyphen, as in ad-hoc decisions affect verb, to influence. See effect afterward not afterwards aka short for also known as. All lowercase letters, no spaces or punctuation ALM see Application Lifecycle Management Anaplan App Hub not AppHub, Anaplan Hub, App Store. Use App Hub on second reference Anaplan Community Capitalize both words, but not the preceding The unless it begins a sentence. Avoid using Community alone to refer to the Anaplan Community. Anaplan Connect Capitalize both words. Is a command-line client to the Anaplan cloud-based planning environment. Anaplan employees or the Anaplan team people who work for Anaplan. Do not use Anaplanners or Anaplan Family to denote employees. Anaplan for Finance Fully written out, title caps Anaplan for Supply Chain Fully written out, title caps Anaplan for Workforce Fully written out, title caps Anaplan Hub or Hub conference not HUB, The Hub conference, Hub18, or Hub'18. When a year is required, write it out (example: Anaplan Hub 2018). Anaplan Partner Portal Capitalize all three words. Use Partner Portal in subsequent references. When you use the word portal by itself, do not capitalize. Anaplan platform Capitalize only the Anaplan name. Anaplan User Group Capitalize the whole phrase. Anaplanner(s) Anaplan users only. Do not use to identify Anaplan employees. Application Lifecycle Management Capitalize all three words, follow with (ALM) in parentheses, then use the abbreviation in subsequent uses. Apps or applications not models   B B2B short for business to business. All capital letters, no spaces or punctuation. Not B-2-B, BtoB, b2b. Use sparingly. backward not backwards Benelux The Benelux region or the Benelux countries (with "the"), but by itself use Benelux (without "the") bottom-up not bottoms-up business partner Capitalize when referring to a specific business partner or to Business Partners as people. When referring to the role itself, it should be lowercase. (Similar to AP Style rules about the United States president.) BYOK bring your own key. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own.   C C-level (note capitalization) C-Suite (note capitalization) capex not CapEx or CAPEX Center of Excellence Don't capitalize of, don't abbreviate as CoE. Plural is Centers of Excellence. CEO not C.E.O., ceo; same for other C-Suite titles (e.g., CFO, CRO, CMO, CIO, etc.). Do not spell out on first use. cloud, cloud-based, cloud delivery preferred over SaaS. Do not capitalize cloud. co- use a hyphen anytime it deals with a person's occupation or position: co-author, co-chair, co-sponsor co-brand to work with a partner in a form that uses both companies' names complementary matching, corresponding. See complimentary complimentary free. See complementary configurable use in place of customizable, which worries IT departments connected planning not capitalized. Do not hyphenate when used as a compound modifier (example: connected planning journey) corporation an entity that is treated as a person in the eyes of the law. Avoid, because it's formal and specific; use company or organization instead. Customer First an internal Anaplan initiative and should not be used in public-facing materials except in authorized contexts. When Customer First is discussed, spell out and capitalize both words; do not shorten to Customer 1st or C1. When used as an adjective, hyphenate and do not capitalize (customer-first culture). customer the organization that licenses the Anaplan platform. Do not use client. See User. cut back verb; the act of reducing something, typically expenditures (to cut back) cutback noun or adjective; the instance of reduction itself (a cutback) CxO (with a lowercase x) is shorthand for anyone in the C-Suite. (CXO in all caps more frequently refers to the chief experience officer.) Use only in tweets and tight places.   D data hub not datahub, not capitalized data sheet not datasheet, not capitalized data use as a singular term (data is, not data are) decision-maker or decision-making hyphenated, not capitalized digital preferred as an adjective (digital processes) but acceptable as a noun (To fully embrace digital, a company must...) digitize not digitalize digitization not digitalization drag and drop verb (drag and drop the folder) and noun (move the folder using drag and drop) drag-and-drop adjective: drag-and-drop capability dynamic cell access can be abbreviated DCA   E e-book not ebook, Ebook, E-book, eBook e.g. means for example. Lowercase with periods, always followed by a comma. See i.e. effect verb, to cause; noun, result. See affect email not e-mail end user synonymous with business user EPM enterprise performance management. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. Excel in the cloud Avoid this term. This sells the Anaplan platform short; Google Sheets is Excel in the cloud. Excel on steroids Avoid this term. This phrase is considered derogatory (an athlete on steroids is cheating, for example) and does not fully represent the capabilities of the Anaplan platform.   F FAQ short for frequently asked questions. Not F.A.Q. or faq. Do not write out ever. file formats are lowercase, preceded by a period (.exe, .csv, .docx) financial planning Use this phrase to indicate planning in the context of a finance department. Financial planning and analysis is more squarely aligned with the office of finance. Do not use finance planning. fintech shorthand for financial technology. Not capitalized. Be sure context is clear. fiscal applies to budgetary matters. See monetary forecasting not financial forecasting unless talking specifically about financial forecasting. forward not forwards FP&A financial planning and analysis; use the ampersand in the abbreviation. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. free avoid using in email subject lines or display copy, as it can trigger spam filters   G Global 2000 the world's largest public companies based on Forbes research. Not G2K or Global 2K. To confirm that a company is on the list, check the official Forbes site.   H hackathon not capitalized unless at the beginning of a sentence, no hyphens hard-code hyphenated, not hardcode Hub Comes to You should be capitalized as shown; never shortened to HCTY or H2U hyper-growth not hypergrowth Hyperblock no capital in the middle HyperConnect Capitalize both the H and the C   I i.e. means that is or in other words. Lowercase with periods, always followed by a comma. See e.g. IBP integrated business planning. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. ICM incentive compensation management. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. impactful avoid; use influential or effective inbox not capitalized indexes not indices internet not capitalized intranet A private network inside a company or organization, only for internal use. Not capitalized   K kick off verb, to begin. Example: Let's kick off this meeting kick-off adjective. Example: We held a kick-off meeting kickoff noun, the beginning of something. Example: We attended the sales kickoff   L Leaders Connect does not have apostrophe link not hyperlink Living Blueprint Avoid this term. This is old messaging. log in verb. Example: Now you can log in to the platform. login noun and adjective. Examples: This is your login; that is your login name.   M Master Anaplanner(s) always capitalized model builder do not capitalize in the flow of a sentence monetary applies to money supply; see fiscal multidimensional not multi-dimensional   N nationwide be sure it's absolutely clear which nation you refer to   O offline/online not capitalized or hyphenated on premise noun. Not on premises, not on prem. (Example: The software is hosted on premise.) on-premise adjective. Not on-premises, not on-prem. (Example: On-premise software is expensive to maintain.) One version of the truth Avoid this term. This is a cliché that does not tell the full story of the Anaplan platform's capabilities. onscreen lowercase, not hyphenated organization preferred word when writing about non-profits and government, which are not for-profit companies   P partner do not capitalize in the flow of a sentence PBF planning, budgeting, and forecasting; no ampersand in the abbreviation. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. per se never per say platform do not capitalize. Use in place of tool or tools principal first in rank, authority, importance or degree. Example: domain principal principle a fundamental truth, law, doctrine or motivating force. Example: I adhere to the principles of business.   Q       R reporter not journalist roll out, rolling out verb. Examples: We will roll out Anaplan, we are rolling out Anaplan rollout noun. Example: Your Anaplan rollout will begin.   S S&OP sales and operations planning; use the ampersand in the abbreviation. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. SaaS Avoid this term. Use cloud or cloud-based sales force two words, not salesforce unless talking about the company Salesforce.com salesperson one word; plural is salespeople. Preferred over salesman or saleswoman. SCM supply chain management. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. searched not Googled silo, silos, siloed   SlideShare   Smart business Avoid this term. This is old messaging. Smart planning Avoid this term. This is old messaging. Use connected planning Solution Architect Capitalize to designate this as an official title. SPM sales performance management. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. Spreadsheet killer Avoid this term. Many potential users (particularly in finance) love spreadsheets. Anaplan is a complementary, and better, alternative. stock-out supply chain term meaning out of stock sync not synch   T that The word that is not preceded by a comma. Example: Customers that prepared for an IPO include Cloudera and Okta. See which, and check Grammarist for a detailed discussion of that vs. which. In most situations, that is a better, more flexible word choice than which. third party noun. Example: The software is licensed to a third party. time zone two words top-down hyphenated; not tops-down toward not towards Twitter capitalized, but tweet and retweet are not   U U.S. not US UK not U.K. Unicorn Avoid this term. We should avoid discussion of the company's valuation and IPO plans. Unstoppable Avoid this term. This is old messaging. until not till or 'til upward not upwards USA not U.S.A. user is an individual who uses the Anaplan platform. An individual is not the customer; the individual's employer is. User Group(s) should always be capitalized User Group Meetup(s) should always be capitalized; meetup used by itself is not capitalized in the flow of a sentence. user name not username   V       W website, webcam, webinar, webmaster should each be one word, not capitalized web page two words, not capitalized which The word which is always preceded by a comma. Example: I got a phone call, which led to a Skype chat, which led to a trip to York. Avoid using which to join multiple ideas into one sentence. (See Comma splice under in the Style Guide, above.) white paper not whitepaper, not capitalized   X       Y       Z  ZBB zero-based budgeting. Spell out without capitals on first use, then give the short version in parentheses. In subsequent uses, use the abbreviation (in all caps) on its own. Do not capitalize except at the beginning of a sentence.
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This article will outline how you can create, edit, and post an article onto the Community. For additional information on what should be included in an article, please see Article-writing Tips. Navigate to the Content Sandbox in the Community Contributor Toolkit. In the top-right corner, click Create an article. Choose the template that you would like to use. You will want to choose Freeform for nearly all instances as this will provide a page similar to a blank Word document On the topic of Word, we recommend writing your article in Word first and saving a local copy. This will help avoid a loss of progress in the event that your Community login times out while you are writing your article.  Copy and paste the article that you wrote in Word into the article body. When you are ready to submit the article for review, click Publish. Content managers and admins will receive a notification to review your article to ensure it meets the Community guidelines and is formatted properly. Your article will be run through a series of review steps that will be tracked by the Community team. If any edits are necessary, Content Managers and/or Admins will reach out to you, or in some cases, apply edits directly to your article. You may review these edits at any time by clicking View article history on your article's page. Doing that allows you to compare revisions to identify what has changed.  Upon approval, the Community team will move the published article to it's assigned knowledge base on behalf of the author.  You will receive notifications to review your content based on the standard review cadence (30 days, 90 days, and then 180 days recurring). Additionally, if changes occur (to a process, the platform, or anything else that would alter the accuracy of your content), make updates in a timely fashion to ensure customers always have the most up-to-date information.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact community@anaplan.com.
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This article will help you put your thoughts and ideas together to write an article for the Anaplan Community. It covers article structure, some helpful hints, and an example so you can get a better idea of what the steps look like. Title: Writing a good title is important. It should give users a good idea of what the article is about, but it needs to be short and to the point.  Community category (knowledge base): Where does the content fit in the Community? Examples include: Anaplan Best Practices > Data Hub Best Practices The Anaplan Way Guide > Implementation Phase What is the purpose of this article? Write a sentence or two that explains the purpose of the article. If there are benefits to the approach, include them here. This will help you stay on track. Examples Include: It provides the information a model builder needs to set up a numbered list. It explains the concept of sparsity. It provides an overview of ALM. It documents the requirements for setting up a data hub. Introduction The introduction is a short paragraph that provides an overview for the reader. It is something that a Community user can read and determine if the article is what they were looking for.  It may be helpful to w rite this las t, once you have your other thoughts in order, since the introduction needs to provide the reader with an accurate expectation of what is to follow. Body You’ve written the purpose of the article. The next step is to put some big ideas on paper: create an outline of the points you want to make in the article. If you are documenting a process, include the main steps and number them if they must be done in a certain order. No need to write full sentences at this point; just get your ideas down. Keep your audience in mind. What do they need to know? What details do they need? What questions or concerns might they have? Are there certain issues (gotchas) that they need to be aware of? Are there other resources you can provide to help them get up to speed? Once you’ve got an outline done (your list of main ideas), sort or organize the flow of the ideas. If you are documenting a process, this might be an easy task. If you are providing information, think about organizing the information by asking yourself "what does a reader need to know before they can understand this?" Organize by starting with the key information a reader needs to know and building from there. Draft Now take your organized outline and write a draft. Do this quickly—put your words and phrases from your outline into sentences and paragraphs. Focus on expressing your ideas. At the end of this step, you’ll have a rough draft. If you are not facing a deadline, save your draft, set it aside to focus on other work, and review it later. Revise your draft by looking at three key areas. Ensure that: the overall flow of the document makes sense. language is clear and concise. Words should generally be short, informal, and concrete. (Do not use "fuzzy words;" make sure that your meaning is clear.) The sentences should mainly be short and simple. you have used a positive, friendly and respectful tone. Final review Your article is coming together! Just a few more final steps.  Start by r unning spell-check.  Next, review your document to see if it follows these guidelines: It identifies a clear purpose and achieves it Any processes it outlines work as written Its content is organized for learning Its language is clear and concise Its tone is friendly, respectful, and audience-appropriate If you are working with a Community Content Manager, they will perform this final review. Draft outline: Draft of the body of the article: Note that this example is just a portion of an article. If you want to read the full article, visit Dashboard settings for improved model performance.
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Content on the Anaplan Community should aim to give customers the best possible experience here. We love that they take the time to share their questions, suggestions, and comments; we appreciate the value their content adds; and we want to support each and every one of them. We are respectful of their opinions and thoughtful in our responses. In every communication a customer reads, hears, or watches, we want our tone to convey that we are listening, we are here for them, and that we respect them. Here are some tips, tricks, and examples to help you achieve a "Customer First" tone in all your content. Instructions Many posts in forums are questions from customers that will lead to a response with instructions. It is important to remember when responding to posts with instructions that we must invite our customers to follow them rather than command them. Examples: You might say: "Would you be able to take a screenshot of that? It would be a huge help if I can compare it to what I see on my end." Instead of:"Please take a screenshot so I can see what's happening and compare it to what I see on my end." You might say: "What I gathered from your question was...But I'm not entirely sure if that is what you need. Would you be able to help clarify?" Instead of: "We need clarification on that." You might say: "If you'd like, you can try..." Instead of:"Try it out!" Apologies We want to ensure our customers know that we are truly sorry for any inconvenience they experience. Please feel free to use the word "sorry" or "we apologize," and try your best to address the end result for the customer, not the end result for Anaplan. Examples: You might say: "I'm so sorry for the interruption we've caused you." Instead of:"I'm so sorry that our platform was down. You might say: "I'm so sorry for the confusion. Unfortunately our platform doesn't work with that tool. Below are a few alternative suggestions that might help you get the job done!" Instead of: "Sorry, that won't work on our platform." You might say: "So sorry for this hassle; we'll be updating again soon." Instead of: "We apologize for the delay." Conversation Style Our customers are smart and innovative people. While we are a B2B company, we need to remember we aren't talking to corporations—we are talking to humans. Always keep conversations respectful, but don't be afraid to keep the tone business casual. Remember to not speak on behalf of the company as a whole. Try using "I" instead of "we." Examples: You might say: "Hi there! Great to hear from you. I'm so glad you asked!" Instead of: "We appreciate you writing in." You might say: "I'd love that feature too!" Instead of: "We see the benefits of that feature." You might say: "We're so excited to share our brand new feature and can't wait to show you how to add this to your account today" Instead of: "This feature will be launched today." Greetings We want our customers to always know that the person behind the computer screen is actually there and here to help them. We strive to use names whenever possible and are sure to invite a reply without demanding one. Examples: You might say: "Hi there, [name]!" Instead of: "Dear [name]," You might say: "Hey, [name]! Sure thing, I can take care of that for you." Instead of: "Yes, I can take care of that for you." Tips While we always want every post to be without error, we are human. Here are a few tips to ensure we are putting our customer first: Ask someone to read your post if you aren't sure how the tone sounds. Read your post out loud to make sure your meaning is clear. Write your post in Word, and use its spelling and grammar checkers to prevent mistakes. Try adding links to your response to further clarify your point. Ask for help. The community team is always more than happy to help you! Reach out to us in the #anaplan-community Slack channel or email community@anaplan.com. Click post just once! Sometimes there's a delay, so if your response doesn't display right away don't worry. Just be patient and things are usually fine.
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Why should you add images to your posts? Let's give your viewers something to see!
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Watch and learn! Find out how videos can illustrate your best practices and ideas.
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This article template shows examples of a table of contents, video, images, and a table.
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To kick this article off, I've uploaded a nice, big banner, and then added this text in the "Add a caption" space below it. Make a big impact with your article by starting it with a large graphic or banner at the very top. Though the banner I've posted here is somewhat simple, your article may benefit from a large, eye-catching graphic posted at the top-center of the page. Additionally, this same idea can be accomplished with a video. Let's take a look at what that looks like directly below this paragraph. Table Sample To complete this template, let's add a large table that's used to compare two ideas: List of Bullet Points List of Bullet Points Green Green Green Green Green Red Red Red Red Red Thanks for viewing this template. If you ave any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact community@anaplan.com.
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This template is an example of how you can use images to bring attention to each section listed in your article. This is useful when you may be using numerous screenshots and other graphcis to support your content. Take a look below! Blue Image Let's start this template with a blue section first! You can import the image you wish to add to your artilce, select the Size of Small, the Position of Left, and then click Done to add the image as you see it here.  You can continue your paragraphs along side of the image just like these... Or, if you space or write down far enough, you can continue your content directly below your image. Notice that the text will wrap around the image and continue into a paragrph below. Now, let's take a look at another layout. Dual Images       As another quick example, you may upload two or more images side-by-side to compare screenshots, ideas, charts, and more! Use this template as a basis when creating your next article with a few images.  Thanks for viewing this template. If you ave any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact community@anaplan.com.
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