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This article will outline how you can create, edit, and post an article onto the Community. For additional information on what should be included in an article, please see Article-writing Tips. Creating your article Navigate to the Content Sandbox in the Community Contributor Toolkit. In the top-right corner, click Create an article. Choose the template that you would like to use. You will want to choose Freeform for nearly all instances as this will provide a page similar to a blank Word document. On the topic of Word, we recommend writing your article in Word first and saving a local copy. This will help avoid a loss of progress in the event that your Community login times out while you are writing your article.  Copy and paste the article that you wrote in Word into the article body. When you are ready to submit the article for review, click Publish. Content managers and admins will receive a notification to review your article to ensure it meets the Community guidelines and is formatted properly. Your article will be run through a series of review steps that will be tracked by the Community team. If any edits are necessary, Content Managers and/or Admins will reach out to you, or in some cases, apply edits directly to your article. You may review these edits at any time by clicking View article history on your article's page. Doing that allows you to compare revisions to identify what has changed.  Upon approval, the Community team will move the published article to it's assigned knowledge base on behalf of the author.  Saving and Accessing Drafts You may sometimes find it necessary to save an article as a draft prior to actually publishing it in the Sandbox per the instructions above. Follow the steps below to save and access your drafts. Follow steps 1-4 as outlined above. Whenever you are ready to suspend writing and return to finish your article later, click Save (instead of clicking Publish as above).  Your article is now saved in the Content Sandbox Drafts. To access the drafts area, click the Options dropdown menu in the top right of the Content Sandbox page. In that dropdown, click Knowledge Base Article Dashboard. Once the dashboard loads, click the Drafts tab. Locate your article draft and click the title. Scroll to the bottom of the article and click Edit Article. Continue writing. Repeat the draft process as needed, or publish as outlined above.  Once your article has been reviewed and approved, the Community team will move the published article to it's assigned knowledge base on behalf of the author.  You will receive notifications to review your content based on the standard review cadence (30 days, 90 days, and then 180 days recurring). Additionally, if changes occur (to a process, the platform, or anything else that would alter the accuracy of your content), make updates in a timely fashion to ensure customers always have the most up-to-date information.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact community@anaplan.com.
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This article will help you put your thoughts and ideas together to write an article for the Anaplan Community. It covers article structure, some helpful hints, and an example so you can get a better idea of what the steps look like. Title: Writing a good title is important. It should give users a good idea of what the article is about, but it needs to be short and to the point.  Community category (knowledge base): Where does the content fit in the Community? Examples include: Anaplan Best Practices > Data Hub Best Practices The Anaplan Way Guide > Implementation Phase What is the purpose of this article? Write a sentence or two that explains the purpose of the article. If there are benefits to the approach, include them here. This will help you stay on track. Examples Include: It provides the information a model builder needs to set up a numbered list. It explains the concept of sparsity. It provides an overview of ALM. It documents the requirements for setting up a data hub. Introduction The introduction is a short paragraph that provides an overview for the reader. It is something that a Community user can read and determine if the article is what they were looking for.  It may be helpful to w rite this las t, once you have your other thoughts in order, since the introduction needs to provide the reader with an accurate expectation of what is to follow. Body You’ve written the purpose of the article. The next step is to put some big ideas on paper: create an outline of the points you want to make in the article. If you are documenting a process, include the main steps and number them if they must be done in a certain order. No need to write full sentences at this point; just get your ideas down. Keep your audience in mind. What do they need to know? What details do they need? What questions or concerns might they have? Are there certain issues (gotchas) that they need to be aware of? Are there other resources you can provide to help them get up to speed? Once you’ve got an outline done (your list of main ideas), sort or organize the flow of the ideas. If you are documenting a process, this might be an easy task. If you are providing information, think about organizing the information by asking yourself "what does a reader need to know before they can understand this?" Organize by starting with the key information a reader needs to know and building from there. Draft Now take your organized outline and write a draft. Do this quickly—put your words and phrases from your outline into sentences and paragraphs. Focus on expressing your ideas. At the end of this step, you’ll have a rough draft. If you are not facing a deadline, save your draft, set it aside to focus on other work, and review it later. Revise your draft by looking at three key areas. Ensure that: the overall flow of the document makes sense. language is clear and concise. Words should generally be short, informal, and concrete. (Do not use "fuzzy words;" make sure that your meaning is clear.) The sentences should mainly be short and simple. you have used a positive, friendly and respectful tone. Final review Your article is coming together! Just a few more final steps.  Start by r unning spell-check.  Next, review your document to see if it follows these guidelines: It identifies a clear purpose and achieves it Any processes it outlines work as written Its content is organized for learning Its language is clear and concise Its tone is friendly, respectful, and audience-appropriate If you are working with a Community Content Manager, they will perform this final review. Draft outline: Draft of the body of the article: Note that this example is just a portion of an article. If you want to read the full article, visit Dashboard settings for improved model performance.
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Content on the Anaplan Community should aim to give customers the best possible experience here. We love that they take the time to share their questions, suggestions, and comments; we appreciate the value their content adds; and we want to support each and every one of them. We are respectful of their opinions and thoughtful in our responses. In every communication a customer reads, hears, or watches, we want our tone to convey that we are listening, we are here for them, and that we respect them. Here are some tips, tricks, and examples to help you achieve a "Customer First" tone in all your content. Instructions Many posts in forums are questions from customers that will lead to a response with instructions. It is important to remember when responding to posts with instructions that we must invite our customers to follow them rather than command them. Examples: You might say: "Would you be able to take a screenshot of that? It would be a huge help if I can compare it to what I see on my end." Instead of:"Please take a screenshot so I can see what's happening and compare it to what I see on my end." You might say: "What I gathered from your question was...But I'm not entirely sure if that is what you need. Would you be able to help clarify?" Instead of: "We need clarification on that." You might say: "If you'd like, you can try..." Instead of:"Try it out!" Apologies We want to ensure our customers know that we are truly sorry for any inconvenience they experience. Please feel free to use the word "sorry" or "we apologize," and try your best to address the end result for the customer, not the end result for Anaplan. Examples: You might say: "I'm so sorry for the interruption we've caused you." Instead of:"I'm so sorry that our platform was down. You might say: "I'm so sorry for the confusion. Unfortunately our platform doesn't work with that tool. Below are a few alternative suggestions that might help you get the job done!" Instead of: "Sorry, that won't work on our platform." You might say: "So sorry for this hassle; we'll be updating again soon." Instead of: "We apologize for the delay." Conversation Style Our customers are smart and innovative people. While we are a B2B company, we need to remember we aren't talking to corporations—we are talking to humans. Always keep conversations respectful, but don't be afraid to keep the tone business casual. Remember to not speak on behalf of the company as a whole. Try using "I" instead of "we." Examples: You might say: "Hi there! Great to hear from you. I'm so glad you asked!" Instead of: "We appreciate you writing in." You might say: "I'd love that feature too!" Instead of: "We see the benefits of that feature." You might say: "We're so excited to share our brand new feature and can't wait to show you how to add this to your account today" Instead of: "This feature will be launched today." Greetings We want our customers to always know that the person behind the computer screen is actually there and here to help them. We strive to use names whenever possible and are sure to invite a reply without demanding one. Examples: You might say: "Hi there, [name]!" Instead of: "Dear [name]," You might say: "Hey, [name]! Sure thing, I can take care of that for you." Instead of: "Yes, I can take care of that for you." Tips While we always want every post to be without error, we are human. Here are a few tips to ensure we are putting our customer first: Ask someone to read your post if you aren't sure how the tone sounds. Read your post out loud to make sure your meaning is clear. Write your post in Word, and use its spelling and grammar checkers to prevent mistakes. Try adding links to your response to further clarify your point. Ask for help. The community team is always more than happy to help you! Reach out to us in the #anaplan-community Slack channel or email community@anaplan.com. Click post just once! Sometimes there's a delay, so if your response doesn't display right away don't worry. Just be patient and things are usually fine.
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