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    The Pre-Release phase of an Anaplan implementation begins when a customer asks for an estimate. During the pre-release phase, all a customer requires is rough estimate. The customer completes a form and may participate in a short scoping session and Anaplan uses that information to prepare a Rough Cut estimate.   When the customer decides to move forward, Anaplan holds a full scoping meeting and ask a lot of questions. Anaplan uses scoping information to prepare a Statement of Work (SOW). Once the SOW is signed, the project is added to the implementation project schedule.   The Rough Cut and SOW set the tone for the Anaplan-customer relationship. In this chapter, learn how to create both Rough Cut and SOW documents.    Tasks Deliverables Tools Rough cut Estimate for customer Rough Cust Estimation model Scoping Meeting SOW, including: High level model design To-be business process overview Scoping Deck Project Scoping and Estimation Model
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When to Use a Rough Cut The Rough Cut process provides a customer with an initial estimate of Anaplan cost and timeline before signing a Statement of Work. The estimate provides a price range for the implementation of the Anaplan platform.   Details Rough Cut What is it Rough estimate referencing similar projects and project teams When and where Session between 1 hour and 1 day Onsite preferred, remote ok Who attends Anaplan: Account Executive, Pre-Sales, Business Partner/ Customer Success Director Prospect: Project Sponsor, IT, SME/Process Owner  Deliverables Rough Estimate presentation from template with a proposed estimated range Tool Customer Success Pitch Deck Scoping Questionnaire Benchmarking Tool Process Based on a short session with prospective project team Turn-around time Two business days   Preparing a Rough Cut Prepare a rough cut estimate using the official Anaplan Rough Cut template: First, gather information. What is the presenting business problem? What should the project accomplish?  Next, determine if Anaplan will recommend a single phase or a multi-phased implementation. What is the typical project length for this type of implementation and project team? Based on comparable data, decide on recommending a single or multi-phase approach. Create an estimated project timeline based on the approach.  Determine the project team’s complexity and effort drivers. Drivers range from low to high. Enter the drivers the Anaplan Rough Cut model to generate a cost range: User base Resources Data reconciliation Metadata and model Reporting Data integration Training and change  Customize the Anaplan Services Proposal presentation with this information.
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Defining the scope of the implementation project is part art, part science.   Consider the state of a customer’s business when they decide to embark on the Anaplan journey. The customer has decided to change, or at least improve, a key process. The customer has also decided to change the application that enables the process.     A single change effort brings a single set of unknowns. Simultaneous changes to both process and platform increase the set of unknowns by an order of magnitude.    The Statement of Work (SOW) is a letter of intent. At the point in time it is written, the SOW defines:  Project-specific activities Project deliverables Project timeline Business requirements Pricing Think of the Statement of Work as a starting point where customer expectations are established. You will manage those expectations in alignment with the scope defined in the SOW.     A Statement of Work requires significant, detailed scope information. To create a SOW, gather scoping information by meeting with a customer, asking questions and using tools to help estimate: The size of the model (memory requirement or size in memory) Scope of work (business requirements) Level of effort to design and build the model
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Model size determines important factors such as: The model topology (whether it is a single or distributed model) The technical infrastructure And in some cases, the cost of the model subscription In a multi-dimensional environment such as Anaplan, each cell represents a piece of data, whether or not it contains data. Empty cells and sparsity are handled well in the Anaplan platform; however, count each cell when sizing. Each cell is approximately 10 bytes of data.   From this calculation, determine the MB and GB model size.   Use the Agile Implementation – The Anaplan Way App to determine size; but first, understand how size is determined. Understanding size helps you realize if something is amiss when working in a model.   In the following illustration, you’ll see how model sizing calculators work. Anaplan has calculators for each type of use case, as dimension intersections play a large role in determining size. Common use cases include: Territory and Quota Planning Sales Planning Financial Planning Workforce Planning Our example looks at three modules from a Territory and Quota Planning model.   We calculate size by looking at the major dimensions and then multiplying to get to a cell count.   Module 1: Sales Forecast Dimensions Line Items Time Versions: actual, budget & forecast Products: 2000 items in the list Sales Organization: 2500 people in the list Units Price Total     SALES FORECAST   J F M A M J J A S O N D FY Units 3 12 78 43 97 34 89 56 98 29 55 23 617 Price $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99 $23.99   Total 71.97 287.88 1871.22 1031.57 2327.03 815.66 2135.11 1343.44 2351.02 695.71 1319.45 551.77     The number of cells for each row is 13: one for each month and a column for the fiscal year.   Module 2: Expense Forecast Dimensions Line Items Time Versions: actual, budget & forecast Sales Organization: 2500 people in the list Airfare Meals Entertainment Total   EXPENSE PLANNING   J F M A M J J A S O N D FY Air $2,879 $1,278 $3,258 $4,300 $1,230 $2,100 $0 $2,340 $0 $5,400 $1,780 $2,200 26,765 Meals $200 $400 $350 $300 $450 $300 $0 $560 $0 $670 $250 $350 3,830 Ent. $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 $300 3,600 Total 3,379 511,200 1,140,300 1,290,000 553,500 630,000 0 1,310,400 0 3,618,000 445,000 770,000 1,359,779   Module 3: Income Statement Dimensions Line Items Time Versions: actual, budget & forecast   Sales Expenses Total   INCOME STATEMENT   J F M A M J J A S O N D FY Bookings $72 $288 $1,871 $1,032 $2,327 $816 $2,135 $1,343 $2,351 $696 $1,319 $552 14,802 Expenses $3,379 $511,200 $1,140,300 $1,290,000 $553,500 $630,000 $0 $1,310,400 $0 $3,618,000 $445,000 $770,000 10,271,779 Total 3,451 147,225,600 2,133,501,300 1,331,280,000 1,287,994,500 514,080,000 0 1,759,867,200 0 2,518,128,000 586,955,000 425,040,000 2,032,072,051   To calculate the size of the model, multiply the numbers across and add up the column. Module Time Product Sales Org Line Items Versions Cells Bytes MB Sales Forecast 13 2000 2500 3 3 585,000,000 5,850,000,000 5,578 Expense Planning 13 0 2500 4 3 390,000 3,900,000 3.7 Income Statement 13 0 0 3 3 117 1,170 0.0011               5,853,901,170 5,615
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In addition to calculating the size of the model, it is necessary to be aware of the user base.  Who will be accessing the model and how often?  Having an accurate estimate of how many users will be using Anaplan at the same time is critical to building the model to meet performance expectations.  The table below is an example of calculating concurrency based on three business units within three main regions of an organization for a model.   Business Unit AMS APJ EMEA TOTAL 1 .10 x 2,470 = 247 .10 x 2,070 = 207 .10 x 3,700 = 370 824 2 .10 x 810 = 81 .10 x 890 = 89 .10 X 700 = 70 240 3 .10 x 350 = 35 .10 x 320 = 32 .10 x 500 = 50 117 TOTAL 363 328 490 1181   This graph represents 10% of total user population using Anaplan concurrently. This is a higher than average number of concurrent users. A distributed model may be required.    
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Scoping focuses on obtaining the right business requirements so the rest of the implementation is successful.    After estimating model size and potential user concurrency, gather the business requirements to fully understand the scope of work. Plan two to three days to a maximum of one week to gather a complete set of requirements. Once you have requirements defined, estimate the effort needed to get the model built in the time required.
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Anaplan has completed many successful implementations over the years. The Project Scoping and Estimation model includes historic project data and logic that helps facilitate the scoping process and produces accurate scope estimations for new projects.   Start on the Scoping Request dashboard, which creates a scoping request comparing the new project with the scope of a past project.   First, select a use case. Next, answer a series of predefined questions. Answers are scored and weighted. Use results to determine how similar the new project is to past projects.
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The SOW covers the estimated project charge. The estimated project charge outlines services for which the customer will be invoiced: Expected number of hours required of the Anaplan team to complete the project Number of Anaplan (and possibly partner) resources assigned to the project Rate for each assigned role Training costs Reasonable out of pocket travel and related expenses The official fee is specified and all payment terms are governed by the signed SOW.
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The Rough Cut or SOW includes a project timeline. Here is an example:     Project Milestone Timeframe Project Start Jan 07 Requirements Phase Jan 07 to Feb 01 Sprint 1 Feb 04 to Feb 22 Sprint 2 Feb 25 to Mar 15 Sprint 3 Mar 18 to Mar 29 Sprint 4 Apr 08 to Apr 26 UAT Phase April 29 to May 17 Tweak Phase May 20 to Jun 07 Production/Go Live June 07
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The Statement of Work (SOW) is a statement of intent. It is not an exhaustive document that outlines every single task, story, and item that will go into a customer’s solution. Neither the customer nor Anaplan can possibly anticipate the final solution. Help customers understand the SOW as a statement of intent – which is likely different from past experience. Anaplan does not delineate every detail in the Pre-Release phase because seldom does end product match scope exactly. Use the Managing the Buckets whiteboard to educate and gain buy-in.
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The Project Scope section includes several paragraphs describing: Current state overview Project objectives A high level drawing of the customer ecosystem, with the Anaplan solution identified Known Unknowns
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No matter how project requirements are defined or how a project compares to others, every project is going to have its share of surprises. Document both knowns and unknowns: Resources for the project Data and metadata Process surrounding the model Acknowledge those things that you just don’t know, that may have a material effect on the release.   What is an example of a known unknown? Perhaps you don’t know what shape the metadata is in. That potentially could be a problem, but at this point you don’t know. Because you don’t know, it is difficult to determine just how much time and resources clean-up of the metadata might take. The clean-up is part of the project, but you can’t say exactly how it will affect the project. Define this as a known unknown that will have a material effect on the project.   How do we manage known unknowns? Everyone should acknowledge them. Everyone needs to think about a contingency, so that when you understand what the known unknown involves, you’ve budgeted for it. This helps the customer handle bumps in the road. Prepare a list of known unknowns and document them in the SOW. Ensure the whole team understands and agrees with the list. In some situations, a project cannot begin with the known unknowns. For example, a customer may not know what SMEs they can provide. These problems indicate unknowns that must be known before the project starts.
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Add the timeline from a completed Rough Cut (if you have one) to the Project Timeline section of the SOW. In the absence of a Rough Cut, create a timeline that includes: Project kickoff Planning Model build and execution Testing Parallel support and go live
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This section of the SOW includes a list of deliverables, by phase, and who (Anaplan or client) is responsible for each deliverable. For example, deliverables in the Foundation Phase include: ETL Requirements – Client responsibility User stories and Acceptance Criteria –Client responsibility Model Design schema – Anaplan responsibility The deliverables should not be edited. If there is a deliverable that isn’t applicable for the project, include NA after the item. Discuss the list with the customer to help set expectations.  
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Complete the roster with the names and roles of the Anaplan/Partner resources as well as the customer resources and their roles. If a rough cut estimate was completed, include the resource page from the deck in this section.
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Enter all scoping information into the Customer Success SOW tool. The tool calculates an estimate of hours required to successfully implement the platform. The tool also determines a final cost estimate. This section includes a screen shot of the Price Table in the Customer Success SOW tool and the total cost estimate, which is the dollar amount of the number of hours required times the rate for each different role, plus travel and expenses.   The SOW also includes these standard sections: Assumptions (Cost, Billing Schedule, and Payment Terms) Change Management Process
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