Installing M2Crypto Python Library on Windows Machine for Certificate Authentication

samlambert
Contributor

Installing M2Crypto Python Library on Windows Machine for Certificate Authentication

Hi guys,

 

I'm running into a few errors trying to install M2Crypto on a windows machine. I've done a fair bit of research and it seems to be a common problem with the library.

 

Wondering if anyone here has experienced similar issues and resolved them? I'm using Win10(64 bit), Python 3.8 through Pycharm. Pip 20.1.1. I've tried to install both M2Crypto and M2CryptoWin64 but I've had no luck.

 

Cheers

12 REPLIES 12
samlambert
Contributor

I haven't resolved the issue yet. I was hoping that someone from Anaplan or the community might know. 

 

I was going to try and revert to an older version of Python, maybe 3.5 or 3.7 and try a stable version of M2Crypto for that.

 

If you do happen to resolve the issue please let me know! 🙂

samlambert
Contributor

@anirudh @mendaye - I think I found the solution on Github: https://github.com/iOSForensics/pymobiledevice/issues/25 (the comment by user tech234a). Anaplan community should consider putting this information somewhere with better visibility.

 

Some builds for m2crypto for specific versions of Python are available from their CI: https://ci.appveyor.com/project/m2crypto/m2crypto/history. Try selecting a version, selecting a job that matches your Python version, then going to the "Artifacts" tab and downloading an installer. To install a .whl file, see step 11 of my build tutorial below.

I have also attached the m2crypto module that I have built on Windows 10 x64, Python 3.8.1. It should work on any x64-based version of Windows with any version of Python 3.8.X. M2Crypto-0.35.2.win-amd64-py3.8.zip

However, if you are unable to find a build that matches your Python version and system type and architecture, you may need to manually build m2crypto. I adapted the build steps from their CI build scripts: https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto/blob/master/appveyor.yml. I built the module by doing the following:

  1. Install the latest Build Tools for Visual Studio 2019. See https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/downloads/ under "All Downloads" -> "Tools for Visual Studio 2019". This direct link was active as of this writing: https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/thank-you-downloading-visual-studio/?sku=BuildTools&rel=16
  2. In the installer, select "C++ Build Tools", install, and reboot if necessary.
  3. Install the latest full (not Light) OpenSSL for your architecture (Win64/Win32). Current version as of this writing is 1.1.1d. Make note of the directory to which you install OpenSSL. https://slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html
  4. In PowerShell, install the Chocolatey package manager. I used this command from their website: Set-ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Scope Process -Force; iex ((New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadString('https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1'))
  5. Install swig with Chocolatey (in PowerShell). choco install -r -y swig
  6. Install the pywin32 dependency. Run pip install pywin32. If you have problems, try first running pip install wheel. To get pip to target a specific Python installation, try launching it using py -[version] -m pip install [module]. Note: you may need to use an elevated (administrator) PowerShell to install Python modules.
  7. Get the latest m2crypto code. If you have git installed, run git clone https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto. Otherwise, download and extract the code from GitLab: https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto/-/archive/master/m2crypto-master.zip
  8. Use cd to change into the directory m2crypto was cloned/extracted to.
  9. Assuming python launches your desired Python interpreter version, run python setup.py build --openssl="C:\Program Files\OpenSSL-Win64" --bundledlls, replacing C:\Program Files\OpenSSL-Win64 with the directory to which you installed OpenSSL. (On some systems you can use the py launcher to specify a Python version to use, run py -h for more information.)
  10. Generate the installable files. python.exe setup.py bdist_wheel bdist_wininst bdist_msi.
  11. Install the module. cd into the dist directory and run pip install M2Crypto-0.35.2-cp38-cp38-win_amd64.whl, replacing the filename with the generated .whl file. If you have problems, try first running pip install wheel. To get pip to target a specific Python installation, try launching it using py -[version] -m pip install [module]. Alternatively, you can run the generated .exe or .msi installer. Note: you may need to use an elevated (administrator) PowerShell to install Python modules.
samlambert
Contributor

Some builds for m2crypto for specific versions of Python are available from their CI: https://ci.appveyor.com/project/m2crypto/m2crypto/history. Try selecting a version, selecting a job that matches your Python version, then going to the "Artifacts" tab and downloading an installer. To install a .whl file, see step 11 of my build tutorial below.

I have also attached the m2crypto module that I have built on Windows 10 x64, Python 3.8.1. It should work on any x64-based version of Windows with any version of Python 3.8.X. M2Crypto-0.35.2.win-amd64-py3.8.zip

However, if you are unable to find a build that matches your Python version and system type and architecture, you may need to manually build m2crypto. I adapted the build steps from their CI build scripts: https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto/blob/master/appveyor.yml. I built the module by doing the following:

  1. Install the latest Build Tools for Visual Studio 2019. See https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/downloads/ under "All Downloads" -> "Tools for Visual Studio 2019". This direct link was active as of this writing: https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/thank-you-downloading-visual-studio/?sku=BuildTools&rel=16
  2. In the installer, select "C++ Build Tools", install, and reboot if necessary.
  3. Install the latest full (not Light) OpenSSL for your architecture (Win64/Win32). Current version as of this writing is 1.1.1d. Make note of the directory to which you install OpenSSL. https://slproweb.com/products/Win32OpenSSL.html
  4. In PowerShell, install the Chocolatey package manager. I used this command from their website: Set-ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Scope Process -Force; iex ((New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadString('https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1'))
  5. Install swig with Chocolatey (in PowerShell). choco install -r -y swig
  6. Install the pywin32 dependency. Run pip install pywin32. If you have problems, try first running pip install wheel. To get pip to target a specific Python installation, try launching it using py -[version] -m pip install [module]. Note: you may need to use an elevated (administrator) PowerShell to install Python modules.
  7. Get the latest m2crypto code. If you have git installed, run git clone https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto. Otherwise, download and extract the code from GitLab: https://gitlab.com/m2crypto/m2crypto/-/archive/master/m2crypto-master.zip
  8. Use cd to change into the directory m2crypto was cloned/extracted to.
  9. Assuming python launches your desired Python interpreter version, run python setup.py build --openssl="C:\Program Files\OpenSSL-Win64" --bundledlls, replacing C:\Program Files\OpenSSL-Win64 with the directory to which you installed OpenSSL. (On some systems you can use the py launcher to specify a Python version to use, run py -h for more information.)
  10. Generate the installable files. python.exe setup.py bdist_wheel bdist_wininst bdist_msi.
  11. Install the module. cd into the dist directory and run pip install M2Crypto-0.35.2-cp38-cp38-win_amd64.whl, replacing the filename with the generated .whl file. If you have problems, try first running pip install wheel. To get pip to target a specific Python installation, try launching it using py -[version] -m pip install [module]. Alternatively, you can run the generated .exe or .msi installer. Note: you may need to use an elevated (administrator) PowerShell to install Python modules.